Latinos

5:35am

Thu May 23, 2013
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays

Living In Two Worlds, But With Just One Language

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 10:24 pm

Elysha O'Brien and her husband, Michael, with their sons. Elysha never learned Spanish but is determined that her children will.
Courtesy of the O'Brien family

NPR continues its conversations about The Race Card Project, where NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris asks people to send in six-word stories about race and culture. The submissions are personal, provocative and often quite candid.

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2:49am

Tue May 14, 2013
Education

Latino High School Grads Enter College At Record Rate

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 3:46 pm

Jackeline Lizama (front) plans to attend a local community college after she graduates next month from her high school in Silver Spring, Md.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

If the headline caught your eye, here's more good news.

Seven in 10 Latino high school graduates in the class of 2012 went to college, according to a recent report by the Pew Hispanic Center.

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1:32am

Thu May 9, 2013
It's All Politics

Democrats Hope For A Bright Future In The Lone Star State

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 3:51 am

Voters leave the Old Blanco Courthouse in Blanco, Texas, after casting their ballots in November 2012. Democrats hope demographics and a new organizational push give them a brighter future in Texas.
Eric Gay AP

President Obama travels to Texas on Thursday for the second time in as many weeks. He will talk about job training and economic opportunity, but he may have a political opportunity on his mind as well.

Obama lost Texas by more than 1 million votes last year. But Democrats believe their fortunes in the Lone Star State may soon change, thanks to demographics and a new organizational push.

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3:13am

Sun April 28, 2013
Code Switch

For Some Young Latinos: Donkey Jaws And Latino Roots

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 12:40 pm

Marco Santiago plays a quijada in his home.
Farida Jhabvala Romero Radio Bilingue

We love hearing stories of how you straddle all the different cultures in your life. That's why we're sharing this report, about retro-acculturation, from our friends at Latino USA.

The process of integrating into mainstream America is a complex one if you are an immigrant. Often, people lose touch with their country of origin.

But for people like Marco Polo Santiago, the reverse is also true. Second, third and fourth-generation immigrants are seeking out their roots and creating a trend of their own.

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3:51pm

Tue April 23, 2013
Around the Nation

Thousands Have Applied For 'Deferred Action' Program

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 6:05 am

Young people wait in line to enter the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles office on the first day of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in August.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

As Congress continues its debate over immigration reform, nearly a half-million young people who are in the U.S. illegally have already applied for deferred action.

The Obama administration started the policy, formally known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, last year for people who were brought into the U.S. illegally as children. Those who are approved gain the right to work or study and avoid deportation for two years.

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