Local Food

5:00am

Mon November 4, 2013
Agriculture

Joel Salatin: Local Food Movement Still Faces Big Hurdles

Joel Salatin, a farmer and author, is one of the top opinion leaders in the local food movement.
Credit dabdiputs / flickr/Wikimedia Commons

Joel Salatin is one of the rock stars of the local food movement. He’s written books, appeared in documentaries and scheduled speaking engagements nationwide. Among foodies, he’s a celebrity.

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6:00am

Sat October 26, 2013
Garden Report

What's So Great About Locally Grown Food?

Ooh, fresh veggies! The bounty of a local farm.
Credit Lord Mariser / Flickr - Creative Commons

The best thing we can do to eat healthier and to bolster our local economy is to buy locally grown food. At our house, groceries are a big part of our bills. So, for us, groceries are an important place to spend locally.

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1:29pm

Wed October 16, 2013
Agriculture

Turning A Public Park Into An Edible Forest Free-For-All

Stephanie Syson, manager at the Central Rocky Mountain Permaculture Institute, holds a map of the planned food forest in Basalt, Colo.'s Ponderosa Park.
Credit Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

5:00am

Wed October 9, 2013
Agriculture

The Long, Slow Decline Of The U.S. Sheep Industry

Once a staple part of the American diet, we’re eating a lot less lamb. The U.S. sheep herd today is just one-tenth the size it was in the 1940s.
Luke Runyon KUNC and Harvest Public Media

Over the last 20 years, the number of sheep in this country has been cut in half. In fact, the number has been declining since the late 1940s, when the American sheep industry hit its peak. Today, the domestic sheep herd is one-tenth the size it was during World War II.

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5:00am

Mon September 30, 2013
Agriculture

Is Millet The Next Trendy Grain?

Millet, long an ingredient in bird feed, could be the next food to capitalize on the heritage grain trend.

Heritage grains are trendy. Walk through a health food store and see packages of grains grown long before modern seed technology created hybrid varieties, grains eaten widely outside of the developed world: amaranth, sorghum, quinoa.

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