Mars

5:00am

Thu September 18, 2014
Outer Space

NASA Mars Mission, Led By CU-Boulder, Readies For Orbit

Artist rendition of the MAVEN spacecraft.
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Four billion years ago, Mars may have looked completely different. Water could have flowed across the planet's surface. There might have been life. To support these conditions, the planet's atmosphere must have been very different.

A NASA mission to investigate that atmosphere – and why it changed – is about to enter orbit around the Red Planet. Led by scientists at the University of Colorado Boulder, the mission, called MAVEN (short for Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN), consists of a satellite that will orbit the planet.

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10:18am

Mon November 18, 2013
Space

VIDEO: Watch CU Boulder’s MAVEN Launch To Mars

Screen capture from NASA livestream of MAVEN launch.
NASA

1:40pm

Thu September 19, 2013
Science

Mars Rover Data Dims Hope Of Finding Life On Red Planet

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 5:19 pm

A self portrait mosaic of the Mars Curiosity Rover inside the Gale Crater.
NASA

When the Mars Curiosity made its dramatic and first-of-its-kind landing on Mars in August of 2012, the hope was that the $2.5-billion rover could confirm what scientists had suspected: that there was life on Mars.

Today, in a paper released in the journal Science, researchers explain that if the Red Planet is harboring life, the instruments on the rover have been unable to sniff it out.

NPR's Joe Palca filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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9:15am

Thu August 29, 2013
Science

Are We Martians? Scientist Says We Just Might Be

Mars: Our "home" planet?
NASA Getty Images

As Adam Frank has said over on the 13.7 blog, "Earth and Mars have been swapping spit (astrobiologically speaking) for eons ... [and] it is entirely possible we were Earth's first alien invasion."

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9:45am

Fri August 16, 2013
The Salt

Eating On Mars? Be Sure To Pack The Tortillas

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 2:27 pm

Mission to Mars: Six explorers lived in this simulated Mars habitat in Hawaii for four months, part of a NASA study to test the role of cooking and food on an extended space mission.
Sian Proctor NASA HI-SEAS

After several months of freeze-dried food, even the most committed carnivores would probably reach for the fresh produce.

So it's no surprise that the six explorers who were cooped up studying space-friendly foods on a simulated mission to Mars for the past four months went right for the mangoes and pineapple during their first meal outside their habitat Aug. 13.

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