Mexico

12:59pm

Thu April 17, 2014
The Salt

Chili Say What? Linguistics Help Pinpoint Pepper's Origins

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 5:29 pm

New research has traced chili peppers back to their origin in eastern Mexico.
iStockphoto

Count us among those who just can't get enough chili pepper news.

These spicy fruits are beloved around the world for their ability to sex up nearly any cuisine. They're the world's most widely grown spice crop, so it's hard to imagine that their reach was once limited to the early farmers in what is now eastern Mexico.

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3:00pm

Fri April 4, 2014
Environment

Waters Will Flood Part Of Colorado River, For Just A Few Weeks

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 6:03 pm

Thanks to an agreement between the U.S. and Mexico, water is flowing to 35 million people in both countries along the Colorado River Delta. At least for now.
Ted Robbins/NPR

Millions of gallons of water used to flow every day from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of California. Now, the Colorado River ends at Morelos Dam on the U.S.-Mexico border. Below it, one of North America's largest wetlands is dry.

Karl Flessa, a geoscientist at the University of Arizona, began researching the damage two decades ago. Then he started asking how much water it would take to bring back some of the habitats.

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6:16am

Thu April 3, 2014

Welcome To The Borderland

Lead in text: 
It is so much more than what you heard. Morning Edition's trip along the border is captured here in 12 vignettes highlighting the people, places, maps and the physical barriers found on both sides.
Source: Npr
The U.S.-Mexico border is not a line. It's a place. NPR's Morning Edition spent two weeks driving it — a 2,428 mile road trip. Here are 12 short stories sharing what they found.

7:40am

Fri March 28, 2014
The Salt

The Hippest Winery In Mexico Is Made Of Recycled Boats

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 11:22 am

Architects Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent incorporated materials salvaged from boats into the Vena Cava winery in Baja's Guadalupe Valley.
Courtesy of Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent

A lot of artists say they find inspiration in unlikely places. Architects Alejandro D'Acosta and Claudia Turrent, designers based in Ensenada, Mexico, most often find theirs digging through dumpsters and junkyards.

Their work, however, isn't remotely trashy. One of their latest creations, the Vena Cava winery in Baja's Guadalupe Valley, is sleek and totally modern. It's one of a growing number of wineries that's designed to give visitors a memorable visual experience — not just a taste of fine wine.

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2:58am

Fri March 28, 2014
Borderland

Born From The Border, Tijuana Grows In New Ways

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 9:24 am

Family members huddle at the fence to talk to loved ones living across the border.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Tijuana is itself a creation of the border. The borderline was drawn here in 1848, as the United States completed its conquest of the present-day American Southwest. The border, along with the growth of San Diego and Los Angeles, gave Tijuana a reason to be.

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