Military

10:33am

Wed April 4, 2012
The Two-Way

Military Proceeds With Guantanamo Trial Of Sept. 11 Mastermind

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 12:24 pm

The U.S. military announced today that it was ready to proceed with the war crimes tribunal of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four other Guantanamo prisoners suspected of orchestrating the Sept. 11 attack on the United States.

NPR's Dina Temple-Raston reports this is important because it means that Mohammed must be arraigned within 30 days. This step is basically a military grand jury agreeing that there is enough evidence to proceed with a trial.

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1:51pm

Tue April 3, 2012
Military

Fort Carson Leaders, Educators Gather to Discuss Opportunities

Colorado National Guard

Senior leaders from Fort Carson Army Post and administrators from Colorado’s colleges and universities are meeting today to discuss educational opportunities for wounded soldiers, and those preparing to leave the military.

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10:01pm

Sun April 1, 2012
The Two-Way

Top Prosecutor At Guantanamo Military Commissions To Retire

Originally published on Sun April 1, 2012 10:03 pm

Brig. Gen. Mark S. Martins.
U.S. Central Command

NPR has learned that the top prosecutor at the Guantanamo Bay military commissions has asked to retire from the military after he finishes his assignment there.

Brig. Gen. Mark Martins says he hopes the decision will drain some of the politics out of the chief prosecutor's position and will provide some continuity.

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7:17pm

Sat March 31, 2012
The Impact of War

Home Front: Soldiers Become Civilians Again

Originally published on Fri May 11, 2012 8:33 pm

Briefings are part of the demobilization process that the 182nd Infantry Regiment must go through at Camp Atterbury in Columbus, Ind.
Tom Dreisbach NPR

We first met the soldiers of the 182nd Infantry Regiment of the Army National Guard about a week ago, on an airport tarmac. They had just landed in the United States after wrapping up a yearlong deployment to Afghanistan.

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12:52pm

Wed March 28, 2012
Mental Health

Staff Sgt. Bales Case Shows Stigma, Paradox Of PTSD

Originally published on Fri March 30, 2012 12:14 pm

The U.S. military is trying to improve treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. But many veterans say they're still under pressure to deny they have problems. Here, military personnel attend a presentation on PTSD at Fort Hamilton Army Garrison in Brooklyn, N.Y., in December 2009.
Chris Hondros Getty Images

The case of Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, the U.S. soldier charged with killing 17 Afghan villagers, has led the Army to review how troops are screened for post-traumatic stress disorder. The Pentagon and the Department of Veterans Affairs say they have invested heavily in the treatment of PTSD to deal with a growing caseload.

But the stigma associated with the disorder continues to complicate efforts to treat it. It has also fueled serious misconceptions about its effects — such as the notion that PTSD causes acts of extreme violence.

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