Mississippi

4:04am

Wed June 5, 2013
Code Switch

Fifty Years After Medgar Evers' Killing, The Scars Remain

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 7:20 am

Medgar Evers' widow, Myrlie, comforts the couple's 9-year-old son, Darrel, at her husband's funeral in Jackson, Miss., on June 15, 1963.
AP

For Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain NAACP leader Medgar Evers, the memories of 1963 are still raw.

Her family lived in terror behind the locked doors of their Jackson, Miss., home — a modest, three-bedroom, ranch-style house in one of the first new subdivisions built for African-Americans in Mississippi's segregated capital city. A back window in the tiny kitchen frames the backyard where Evers-Williams once grew rose bushes and a plum tree.

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5:48pm

Mon June 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Mississippi Man Indicted On Charges Of Mailing Ricin Poision

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 6:45 pm

James Everett Dutschke has been indicted on five counts related to letters containing the poison ricin that were sent to President Obama and others.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

James Everett Dutschke, the Mississippi man arrested in April on suspicions that he sent letters containing the poison ricin to President Obama and other officials, has been indicted on five federal charges, from sending threats in the mail to knowingly making and possessing "a biological agent... for use as a weapon."

Maximum punishments for the counts leveled against Dutschke, 41, range from five years to life in prison.

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5:22pm

Mon June 3, 2013
Shots - Health News

Miss. Turns To 'Cord Blood' To Track Down Statutory Rapists

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 6:43 am

Gov. Phil Bryant, at the Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Summit in Jackson, Miss., in 2012, supports a controversial effort to identify men who impregnate teen girls.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Mississippi lawmakers have embarked on a controversial campaign to discourage older men from having sex with teenagers.

Starting in July, doctors and midwives in the state will be required by law to collect samples of umbilical cord blood from babies born to some girls under the age of 16. Officials will analyze the samples and try to identify the fathers through matches in the state's DNA database.

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3:32pm

Wed May 15, 2013
Politics

One Reason To Apply For Tax-Exempt Status: Anonymity

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 7:07 pm

The exterior of the Internal Revenue Service building in Washington.
Susan Walsh AP

Revelations that the Internal Revenue Service targeted some conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status for extra scrutiny have put a spotlight on a part of the tax code increasingly popular with political groups: section 501(c)(4).

But what's the benefit for organizations to get approved for 501(c)(4) status?

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2:03pm

Fri May 3, 2013
NPR News Investigations

Justice In The Segregated South: A New Look At An Old Killing

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 4:41 am

When John Queen died in August 1965 in front of the Ice House (the building between the Standard Oil station and The Dollar Store), rules of racial inferiority were so entrenched in Fayette, Miss., that black residents felt they couldn't complain. But just four months later things changed and black residents marched on Dec. 24 as part of their boycott against white-owned businesses.
Jack Thornell AP

This story contains language that some may find offensive.

In the segregated South in 1965, John Queen was about as insignificant as a man could be. He was black, elderly and paralyzed. His legs had been crushed when as a boy he fell off a roof. For the rest of his life, he pulled himself around with his hands.

In Fayette, Miss., he would shine shoes on Main Street for a few coins. People called him "Crippled Johnny" or "Shoe-Shine Johnny."

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