Montana

2:47pm

Wed August 27, 2014
Science

There's A Big Leak In America's Water Tower

Originally published on Wed August 27, 2014 5:29 pm

Joe Giersch, an ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey, studies stoneflies that live only in the melt from glaciers and snowpack in the northern Rockies.
Clint Muhlfeld USGS

The northern arm of the Rocky Mountains is sometimes called "the crown of the continent," and its jewels are glaciers and snowfields that irrigate large parts of North America during spring thaw.

But the region is getting warmer, even faster than the rest of the world. Scientists now say warming is scrambling the complex relationship between water and nature and could threaten some species with extinction as well as bring hardship to ranchers and farmers already suffering from prolonged drought.

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1:45am

Wed July 2, 2014
The Race Card Project

A Woman Wrestles With A Disturbing Family Memento

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 12:15 pm

Carol Zachary's grandfather, Herbert Fleming, a county auditor, was required to attend Montana's first legal triple-hanging in a barn in Meagher County, Mont., in 1917. Fleming was one of approximately 60 witnesses that day.
Courtesy of Carol Zachary

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris dips into those stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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5:00am

Fri June 27, 2014
Oil and Gas

Following In Washington's Footsteps, Montana Releases Crude Oil Rail Routes

A BNSF train outside of Houston, Texas. As a company, BNSF ships large ammounts of Bakken crude oil.
Roy Luck Flickr - Creative Commons

A dozen or more trains carrying crude oil from the Bakken region are moving across northern Montana every week, skirting the edge of Glacier National Park. More trains - far fewer in number - pass through populated regions farther south.

Governor Steve Bullock has released the route information, making Montana the latest state, after Washington, to buck railroads’ requests to keep the information out of public hands.

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1:14pm

Fri May 30, 2014
Arts & Life

Kayakers Backtrack In The Footsteps Of Lewis & Clark

Joe Zimmerman (right) and filmmaker Nick Caiazza (left) standing near the start of their nearly 4,000 mile kayaking journey.
Blackwater Drifters

More than 200 years ago, Lewis and Clark launched their expedition on the Missouri River with $2,500, bringing back stories about lands most Americans had never seen. Dipping his toes in history, Joe Zimmermann will launch an expedition of his own lifetime — a 21st century effort complete with a kayak, GPS trackers, a documentary filmmaker and $15,000 in donations.

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6:00am

Wed April 16, 2014
Science

A T. Rex Treks To Washington For A Shot At Fame

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 2:33 pm

Pat Leiggi (right) of the Museum of the Rockies prepares to move a leg bone of the T. rex at the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday.
Maggie Starbard NPR

This week, scientists at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History will start unpacking some rare and precious cargo. It's something the Smithsonian has never had before — a nearly complete skeleton of a Tyrannosaurus rex.

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