National Security

6:53am

Tue June 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Pew: Majority Of Americans Support NSA Phone Tracking

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:05 am

A table showing how the public feels about the balance of privacy and security.
Pew

We're a little late noting this poll, but it's important so we're backing up a bit: A Pew poll released Monday finds a majority of Americans — 56 percent — think the National Security Agency's tracking of phone records "is an acceptable way for the government to investigate terrorism."

Forty-one percent say it is unacceptable.

Pew adds:

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5:42am

Tue June 11, 2013
The Two-Way

As NSA Leaker Disappears, Talk Of More To Come And Charges

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:05 am

Edward Snowden's revelations about National Security Agency have been front page news around the world, including in Hong Kong — where he was last seen.
Bobby Yip Reuters /Landov

3:23am

Tue June 11, 2013
National Security

Will Surveillance Disclosure Lead To More Oversight Of NSA?

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. The recent leaks revealing the extent of the National Security Agency surveillance programs came as news to many people. But some members of Congress have been warning for years that such surveillance could threaten the privacy of average Americans.

NPR's Larry Abramson reports that in the end, it was Congress that decided not to disclose details about these programs to the public.

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3:23am

Tue June 11, 2013
Business

Data Leak Could Undermine Trust In Government Contractor

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:56 am

Federal contractor Booz Allen Hamilton, headquartered in McLean, Va., employed Edward Snowden, the computer technician at the center of the controversy over leaks involving the National Security Agency.
Michael Reynolds EPA/Landov

In recent decades, a quiet revolution has been transforming the way Washington works.

Because the U.S. government does not have the workforce to complete all of its tasks, it employs private companies like Booz Allen Hamilton to do the work for it. Booz Allen is the company where Edward Snowden, who said he leaked secrets about the National Security Agency, most recently worked.

Over the past 25 years, this contract workforce has grown and plays a major role in the U.S. government, says Paul Light, a professor of public service at New York University.

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5:24pm

Mon June 10, 2013
It's All Politics

Lawmakers Work To Gauge Public Mood On NSA And Leaker

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 6:17 pm

Demonstrators hold signs supporting Edward Snowden in New York's Union Square Park, on Monday. Snowden, who says he worked as a contractor at the National Security Agency and the CIA, gave classified documents to reporters, making public two sweeping U.S. surveillance programs and touching off a national debate on privacy versus security.
Richard Drew AP

When it comes to secrets leaker Edward Snowden and the National Security Agency's phone records and Internet snooping, some in Congress face a dilemma.

Namely, how to read public opinion.

Speaking off the record, aides for Republican and Democratic House lawmakers told me they are getting constituent calls on both sides: from those urging that Snowden not be prosecuted and those insisting he should be.

An aide for one congressman told me her boss's staff was holding off on issuing a statement until it had the chance to further gauge the voters' mood.

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