National Security

12:42pm

Mon February 27, 2012
National Security

U.S., Iran Eye Each Other Warily In Persian Gulf

An Iraqi jet fired missiles that hit the USS Stark in the Persian Gulf in 1987, killing 37 U.S. sailors. Iraq and Iran were at war at the time, and the U.S. wanted to keep open the regiion's vital oil shipping lanes. The current friction between the U.S. and Iran has again raised tension in the Gulf.
U.S Navy AP

History never repeats itself exactly. But the current escalation in tension and rhetoric between the United States and Iran has revived memories of the Persian Gulf tanker war of the 1980s.

As an offshoot of the war taking place back then between Iran and Iraq, the U.S. offered protection to Kuwaiti ships carrying oil through the Straits of Hormuz. This led to attacks on multiple military and civilian ships. In addition, the U.S. Navy in 1988 shot down an Iranian airliner that was mistaken for a jet fighter.

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6:00am

Mon February 27, 2012
The Two-Way

WikiLeaks Starts Posting Millions Of Security Firm Stratfor's Emails

Originally published on Mon February 27, 2012 6:46 am

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is driven away in a taxi after leaving his hearing at the Supreme Court in London, Thursday, Feb. 2, 2012.
Matt Dunham AP

"The anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks began publishing on Monday more than five million emails from a U.S.-based global security analysis company that has been likened to a shadow CIA," Reuters writes.

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5:00am

Mon February 27, 2012
Energy

CSU Forum to Highlight National Security, Renewable Energy

Solar panels soak up rays on the Colorado State University campus.
Grace Hood KUNC

Former Gov. Bill Ritter and the Center for the New Energy Economy at Colorado State University in Fort Collins will host a forum tonight examining the connection between national security and energy.

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2:31pm

Wed February 22, 2012
The Two-Way

In Speech, Top Pentagon Lawyer Defends Targeted Killing Program

The top lawyer at the Pentagon offered a strong defense of the Obama administration's targeted killing program Wednesday, arguing the use of lethal force against the enemy is a "long-standing and long-legal practice."

In a speech at Yale University's Law School, Jeh Johnson said there's no real difference between high tech strikes against members of al-Qaida today and the U.S. military decision to target an airplane carrying the commander of the Japanese Navy in 1943.

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11:26am

Wed February 22, 2012
National Security

Dealing With Dictators, The U.S. Playbook Varies

Originally published on Wed February 22, 2012 2:44 pm

The U.S. has taken very different approaches to authoritarian rulers in recent years. President Obama has called for the ouster of Syrian President Bashar Assad, shown here in Damascus on Jan. 11, but has resisted calls for the use of U.S. military force against the Syrian regime.
STR AFP/Getty Images

What is America's policy when it comes to dictators? Well, it depends.

The U.S. has adopted different approaches toward different dictators and authoritarian regimes in recent years. In some cases — notably Iraq and Afghanistan — the U.S. military invaded to change the leaders of those countries.

But American presidents have also hosted friendly visits with leaders from undemocratic countries with questionable human rights records.

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