National

5:26pm

Tue April 10, 2012
Around the Nation

Zimmerman's Attorneys Withdraw As Counsel

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

In Sanford, Florida, there's been a new development in the Trayvon Martin shooting case. Late today, attorneys for the admitted shooter, George Zimmerman, said they are no longer representing him. Attorney Craig Sonner says they haven't spoken to Zimmerman since Sunday.

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2:52pm

Tue April 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Zimmerman's Lawyers Withdraw From Trayvon Martin Case

Lawyers for George Zimmerman in the case of the shooting death of Trayvon Martin say they are no longer representing the man who killed the unarmed Florida teenager.

Defense attorneys Craig Sonner and Hal Uhrig announced their decision in an appearance outside the Seminole County Courthouse in Sanford, Fla.

The two lawyers said that they had fallen out of contact with Zimmerman.

Uhrig also said that he "heard today" that Zimmerman had been in direct contact with the special prosecutor in the Martin case, according to Reuters.

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2:38pm

Tue April 10, 2012
Religion

A Church Divided: Ruling Ends Va.'s Episcopal Battle

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 6:19 pm

The St. Stephen's Church in Heathsville, Va., has been at the center of an ugly custody battle between the St. Stephen's Episcopal Church and the newly affiliated St. Stephen's Anglican Church.
Barbara Bradley Hagerty for NPR

On a bright Sunday morning in the tiny town of Heathsville, Va., Jeffrey Cerar surveys the church he's preached in for the past 15 years — its 130-year-old wooden pews, its stained glass windows, its paschal candles, its cross.

"Virtually everything you see here is going to stay; the high altar, the credence table, the hymnals and books of common prayer will all stay," he says. "The Bibles will go with us."

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12:40pm

Tue April 10, 2012
U.S.

Tulsa Mourns Man Who 'Never Met A Stranger'

Originally published on Thu April 12, 2012 3:57 pm

A makeshift memorial pays tribute to Bobby Clark, one of the victims of a shooting spree that left three people dead and terrorized Tulsa's African-American community.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Three people were killed in last week's shootings in Tulsa, Okla.: Dannaer Fields, 49; William Allen, 31; and Bobby Clark, 54. Two others were wounded in the shootings. All of them were shot — apparently at random — in the predominantly black neighborhood of Northgate in northern Tulsa.

It was Bobby Clark's brother, Donny, who first found him after the fatal shooting.

"I came through there and I realized it was my brother laying in the street," Clark says. "They shot him under the armpit, and I think it hit his heart."

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11:32am

Tue April 10, 2012
Around the Nation

Philly Cops Bust Crime In 140 Characters Or Fewer

Philadelphia Police Detective Joseph Murray of West Philadelphia is an advocate of police tweeting to help engage the community in fighting crime.
Courtesy of Kimberly Paynter

The Philadelphia Police Department is adding a new tool to its crime-fighting arsenal — Twitter. Supporters say the real-time information-sharing could help police build a stronger rapport with residents and better protect them.

West Philadelphia resident Mike Van Helder remembers when police knocked down his neighbor's door at 6 a.m. "There was shouting and loud noises and of course I didn't know what it was about," Van Helder recalls. "And them being my next door neighbors, I was understandably concerned."

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