National

5:30am

Tue April 3, 2012
The Two-Way

Carnage In Oakland: 'People Started Running, And He Started Shooting'

Police descended on Oikos University in Oakland, Calif., Monday after the shootings that left at least seven people dead.
Noah Berger AP
  • NPR's Richard Gonzales on 'Morning Edition'

Survivors are telling harrowing tales about what happened Monday morning at Oikos University in Oakland when a man who police say once attended the small Christian school allegedly ordered the dozen or so people in a classroom to line up against a wall, drew a handgun and started firing.

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1:39am

Tue April 3, 2012
Around the Nation

Oakland Police: Former University Student Kills 7

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 12:01 pm

Oakland Mayor Jean Quan and Oakland Police Chief Howard Jordan address reporters after a gunman allegedly killed seven people at a California religious college. The suspect, identified as One Goh, is a 43-year-old Korean who has been living in the United States.
Kimihiro Hoshino AFP/Getty Images

Oikos University is housed in a nondescript single-story industrial building in a business park near the Oakland International Airport.

The university's website says it trains men and women "for Christian leadership, both lay and clerical." But it doesn't say how many students attend. It offers courses in nursing, music, biblical studies and Asian medicine. And now it's the site of one of the deadliest mass shootings in California in recent memory.

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1:03am

Tue April 3, 2012
National Security

A Prosecutor Makes The Case For Military Trials

Originally published on Wed April 4, 2012 12:01 pm

Brig. Gen. Mark Martins, the chief prosecutor at Guantanamo Bay, graduated first in his class at West Point, studied as a Rhodes scholar, and attended Harvard Law School. Here he speaks during a press conference at the military facility on Jan 18. following a hearing against Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, the main suspect in the bombing of the USS Cole in 2000.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

The chief prosecutor for the military commissions at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is arguing a difficult case: that the commissions are not only fair, but can take pride of place alongside the civilian criminal justice system.

Brig. Gen. Mark Martins is the chief prosecutor for the commissions, the courts at the naval base that try high-profile terrorism suspects.

He has been called Guantanamo's detox man largely because he has made it his mission to show that the military commissions system at Guantanamo is no longer a toxic version of victor's justice.

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1:00am

Tue April 3, 2012
All Tech Considered

Who Has The Right To Our Facebook Accounts Once We Die?

At least two states are considering laws to require social networking sites to grant loved ones access to the accounts of family members who have died.
Gunay Mutlu iStockphoto.com

When Loren Williams died in a motorcycle crash in 2005, his mother used his Facebook password to read posts on his wall.

"These were postings from personal friends that [said] he meant a lot to them in their lives, and it was very comforting," Karen Williams told KGW television in Portland, Ore. "There were pictures that I had never seen before of his life and just evidence of the wonderful relationships that he had established."

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3:10pm

Mon April 2, 2012
Around the Nation

America's First Celebrity Robot Is Staging A Comeback

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 5:32 pm

Musician Lois Kendall plays the bass while the robot Elektro "conducts" on stage as part of a Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing demonstration at the 1939 World's Fair in New York.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Before IBM's Watson and Deep Blue, there was another celebrity robot: Elektro.

The first robot introduced to Americans, Elektro was the 7-foot-tall man who greeted millions of visitors who streamed through the gates of the 1939 World's Fair. He even appeared on film, in The Middleton Family at the New York World's Fair.

The robot was built as a showpiece for the manufacturer Westinghouse, which made clothing irons and ovens in Mansfield, Ohio, at the time.

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