National

5:49am

Mon April 2, 2012
Around the Nation

The 1940 Census: 72-Year-Old Secrets Revealed

An enumerator interviews a woman for the 1940 census. Veiled in secrecy for 72 years because of privacy protections, the 1940 U.S. census is the first historical federal decennial survey to be made available on the Internet initially rather than on microfilm.
National Archives at College Park

Nylon stockings became all the rage. Black fedoras were the "pure quill" — meaning the real deal. Bing Crosby crooned Only Forever on the console. And Hattie McDaniel was the first African-American actor ever to take home an Oscar.

Ah, 1940. Three score and 12 years ago, America was in a very different place — economically and culturally.

But on April 2, 2012, when the National Archives releases detailed data from the 1940 census, we will get an even keener idea of how much — or how little — this nation has really changed in the past 72 years.

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5:25am

Mon April 2, 2012
The Two-Way

Trayvon Martin Case: Voice Calling For Help Isn't Zimmerman's, Experts Say

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 5:28 am

At a rally in Miami on Sunday, Arleen Poitier held a sign with images of Trayvon Martin.
J Pat Carter AP

Over the weekend, The Orlando Sentinel reported that two experts it consulted believe the voice heard calling for help in the background during a 911 call to police is not that of George Zimmerman, the neighborhood watch volunteer who says he acted in self defense when he shot and killed Trayvon Martin on Feb. 26 in Sanford, Fla.

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5:23am

Mon April 2, 2012

1:44am

Mon April 2, 2012
The Two-Way

The Historic Texas Drought, Visualized

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 11:00 am

Click here to explore the StateImpact interactive.
NPR

A devastating drought consumed nearly all of Texas in 2011, killing livestock, destroying agriculture and sparking fires that burned thousands of homes. It was the worst single-year drought in the state's recorded history.

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10:01pm

Sun April 1, 2012
The Two-Way

Top Prosecutor At Guantanamo Military Commissions To Retire

Originally published on Sun April 1, 2012 10:03 pm

Brig. Gen. Mark S. Martins.
U.S. Central Command

NPR has learned that the top prosecutor at the Guantanamo Bay military commissions has asked to retire from the military after he finishes his assignment there.

Brig. Gen. Mark Martins says he hopes the decision will drain some of the politics out of the chief prosecutor's position and will provide some continuity.

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