National

2:24pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Georgia Farmers Say Immigration Law Keeps Workers Away

In Georgia, farmers have almost everything they need for a successful early harvest, as squash, peppers and peaches are ready for market. But one thing's missing: someone to pick them. Fruit and vegetable farmers blame the state's new immigration reform law, saying it's keeping migrant workers away.

In a Newscast report, Melissa Stiers of Georgia Public Broadcasting spoke to Steven Johnson of South Georgia Produce, who says his crop is ripe on the ground — but there aren't enough people to pick it:

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12:36pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

NPR, 'Charleston Gazette' Ask Court To Unseal Massey Merger Files

The Charleston Gazette and NPR have together filed a legal motion with the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals to open up records related to the merger of Alpha Natural Resources and Massey Energy, the company that operated the Upper Big Branch coal mine in West Virginia, where 29 mine workers died in a massive explosion in April 2010.

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5:08pm

Mon May 23, 2011
History

NY Public Library Celebrates 100 Years Of Open Doors

The New York Public Library on opening day, May 24, 1911.
Library of Congress

The staff at the New York Public Library made some noise Monday while celebrating a major birthday. The library's main building in Manhattan opened to the public exactly 100 years ago.

Ever since, the iconic neo-classical building has welcomed readers from all over the world.

It's also 100 years of Patience and Fortitude: the names of the lion statues that stand guard on the steps of the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan.

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4:06pm

Mon May 23, 2011
Law

Georgia Farmers Brace For New Immigration Law

Migrant workers hand pick Vidalia onions in Georgia. The vegetable is too delicate to be harvested with machines.
Kathy Lohr NPR

Georgia is putting in place a new law aimed at cracking down on illegal immigrants, and many across the state are nervous. Businesses fear an economic boycott, the Latino community fears police officers will abuse their new powers and farmers in South Georgia fear the law will hurt them dramatically.

Georgia is known for its peaches and Vidalia onions, the state vegetable. The specialty crop is produced in just a few counties in the rural southeast part of the state, where the soil is just right.

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12:01am

Mon May 23, 2011
Religion

Doomsday Believers Cope With An Intact World

As recently as two weeks ago, Gary Vollmer was absolutely certain that on May 21, 2011, God would send devastating earthquakes, raise believers to heaven in the "rapture," and then destroy the world five months later. Now that it hasn't happened, Vollmer is unfazed.

"God is God, God's going to do what he has to do," he says.

True, he says, believers got some of the details wrong. But the thrust of the message is right.

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