National

5:58am

Mon September 17, 2012
The Two-Way

Rushdie Decries 'Mindset Of The Fanatic' That Sparks Anti-American Protests

There were also anti-American protests in Kabul on Sunday.
Massoud Hossaini AFP/Getty Images
  • On 'Morning Edition': Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reporting from Kabul
  • Salman Rushdie speaking with NPR's Steve Inskeep on 'Morning Edition'

Anti-American demonstrations tied to the film Innocence of Muslims spread to Afghanistan's capital today, where a thousand or so men and boys shouted "death to America!," burned cars and threw stones at police.

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5:31am

Mon September 17, 2012
Around the Nation

Chicago's O'Hare Needs Help Clearing Brush

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne with a job opening at Chicago's O'Hare airport. Wanted: One herder with a flock of sheep, or goats are OK too. The Sun Times reports that O'Hare is looking for 25 grazing animals to clear out overgrown bushes surrounding the airport. Those bushes attract birds, which are dangerous to aircraft. O'Hare requires the herder to bring a mobile electronic fence to keep his herd off the runway, though apparently a shepherd's crook is optional. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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1:45am

Mon September 17, 2012
History

Antietam: A Savage Day In American History

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:51 am

Between two farm fields in Sharpsburg, Md., there was a sunken road, which Confederates used as a rifle pit until they were overrun by federal troops. The road has since been known as "Bloody Lane."
Library of Congress

On this morning 150 years ago, Union and Confederate troops clashed at the crossroads town of Sharpsburg, Md. The Battle of Antietam remains the bloodiest single day in American history.

The battle left 23,000 men killed or wounded in the fields, woods and dirt roads, and it changed the course of the Civil War.

It is called simply the Cornfield, and it was here, in the first light of dawn that Union troops — more than 1,000 — crept toward the Confederate lines. The stalks were at head level and shielded their movements.

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1:38am

Mon September 17, 2012
Around the Nation

Kilpatrick Corruption Case A 'Classic Greek Tragedy'

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:51 am

The city of Detroit is preparing for what could be the highest-profile public corruption trial in its history. Former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick faces federal charges that he used city government to operate a widespread criminal enterprise.

In 2008, the then-mayor was embroiled in a scandal over racy text messages to his mistress, and his family was being pursued for interviews by what he labeled a white racist media. At the end of a televised State of the City address, before a handpicked crowd of supporters, Kilpatrick fired back at his critics.

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9:08am

Sun September 16, 2012
Around the Nation

Many Texans Bereaved Over 'Dead' Voter Purge

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:36 am

Quite a few Texas voters are seeing dead people in the mirror these days when they go to brush their teeth in the morning.

In Houston, high school nurse Terry Collins got a letter informing her that after 34 years of voting she was off the Harris County rolls. Sorry.

"Friday of last week, I got a letter saying that my voting registration would be revoked because I'm deceased, I'm dead. I was like, 'Oh, no I'm not!' " Collins says.

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