National

1:39am

Wed September 12, 2012
National Security

Software, Not Just Bullets, Puts Military At Odds

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

Soldiers use DCGS-A software at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland.
U.S. Army

Military commanders, government officials and members of Congress have long wrangled over which weapon systems are needed. Now, there's an argument over what computer software should be provided to soldiers in Afghanistan. It's a defense dispute for the digital age.

In recent years, the ability to analyze data has become almost as important to U.S. war-fighters as the guns they use.

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1:38am

Wed September 12, 2012
Law

U.S. Grows An Industrial Complex Along The Border

Originally published on Wed September 12, 2012 7:28 pm

A Border Patrol agent offers water to two men caught after illegally entering the U.S. through the Arizona desert. Roughly 80,000 federal workers have jobs related to immigration enforcement.
Ted Robbins NPR

The United States' southern border bristles with technology and manpower designed to catch illegal immigrants and drug smugglers. Since 1986, the government has spent hundreds of billions of dollars on fences, aircraft, detention centers and agents.

But even as federal budgets shrink and illegal immigration ebbs, experts say that there's no end in sight for the growth of the border-industrial complex.

A Growing Investment On The Border

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5:01pm

Tue September 11, 2012
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century

Racial, Regional Divide Still Haunt Detroit's Progress

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 8:20 pm

Part of the wall that was built in 1940 has since been painted over with a mural.
Detroit1701.org Collection maintained at the Univ. of Michigan by Ren Farley and Judy Mullin

For many years — perhaps even decades — Detroit has been the poster child for economic malaise. Adjusting for inflation, per capita income in metro Detroit dropped more than 20 percent between 1999 and 2010.

Some analysts say regional cooperation might have helped keep Detroit above water when the car industry sank, but that entrenched divisions that pit the city against its suburbs, and blacks against whites, have hindered that.

A Deeply Entrenched Regional Divide

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4:56pm

Tue September 11, 2012
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century

City Life Snapshot: Music In Austin, Texas

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 8:46 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

A different take on city as melting pot now, in this City Life Snapshot from Austin, Texas.

BALDOMERO FRANK ALVAREZ CUELLAR: I'm Baldomero Frank Alvarez Cuellar, and that's a mouthful. And I am one-half of the owners of Rancho Alegre Radio.

BLOCK: Back in the '70s and '80s, Conjunto music was everywhere in Austin, and Alvarez is trying to bring it back.

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3:47pm

Tue September 11, 2012
The Two-Way

Chicago Mayor Emanuel Does Not Like Nickelback, Spokesperson Says

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 3:53 pm

A sign seen during a protest by the Chicago Teachers Union.
Daniel Strauss via Twitter

The strike going on in Chicago is serious: 350,000 students are locked out and we brought you the news in a post from this morning.

We'll get back to real news in a little. First, here's a bit of levity:

There is a picture from the picket lines on Monday that had Daniel Strauss, who tweeted it, saying, "Civility has disappeared in Chicago Teachers Union protests."

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