New York

3:52am

Mon November 11, 2013
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays

Seeing Opportunity In A Question: 'Where Are You Really From?'

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 9:40 am

Alex Sugiura was featured, along with his brother and other mixed-race Americans, in the 125th anniversary issue of National Geographic Magazine in October. The brothers are of Japanese and Eastern European descent, but people often mistake Alex for Hispanic.
Martin Schoeller National Geographic

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

"Where are you from?"

"No, really, where are you from?"

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2:47am

Fri November 8, 2013
Architecture

Size Does Matter, At Least In The Tallest Building Debate

Originally published on Fri November 8, 2013 12:20 pm

The view from the Willis Tower, formerly known as Sears Tower, in Chicago.
FleishmanHillard

There's a question that's looming over the new skyscraper at the World Trade Center site in New York: Should it count as the tallest building in the country?

The developers say yes. But by some measures, the Willis Tower in Chicago — formerly known as Sears Tower — can still lay claim to the title.

Now, an obscure organization known as the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat is preparing to settle the debate.

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1:17am

Fri November 1, 2013
The Salt

Can Starbucks Do For Tea What It Has Done For Coffee?

Originally published on Fri November 1, 2013 9:59 am

A pot of tea sits at the newly opened Teavana tea bar in New York City.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Starbucks, which revolutionized the coffee industry, is now taking on tea. It has opened its first tea bar, and it's creating mixed tea beverages, some even more complex and customized than the coffee beverages we all know.

This first store, on Madison Avenue in Manhattan, has minimalist decor: gray soft seats, charcoals, chestnut browns. Teavana teas line one wall. Beakers filled with colored liquids greet you at the entrance.

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1:23am

Tue October 22, 2013
Around the Nation

West Point Women: A Natural Pattern Or A Camouflage Ceiling?

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 9:53 am

At the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, N.Y., the graduating class has been about 16 percent female since the institution first accepted women more than 30 years ago.
Mike Groll AP

At the 200-year-old U.S. Military Academy at West Point, tradition dictates everything. That includes the habit of having freshmen stand in the yard everyday and call cadets to lunch. It's also tradition that the overwhelming majority of the graduating class will be white and 84 percent male.

Some say those rates are due to natural patterns of matriculation.

"Women will naturally matriculate — or, they have naturally matriculated — into the academy at about the 16 to 17 percent rate," says West Point admissions director Col. Deborah McDonald.

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10:56am

Fri October 11, 2013
Shutdown

Some States Allowed To Reopen National Parks — And Foot The Bill

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 6:16 pm

Dawn at Mesa Arch in Canyonlands National Park is a favorite moment for photographers from all over the world. They'll soon be able to return to the park, given Utah's deal with the Interior Department to fund park operations.
Courtesy of Wanda Gayle

"This is a godsend!" exclaimed Utah Gov. Gary Herbert late Thursday night, as he signed an agreement with the Department of the Interior to use state funds to reopen eight national park areas in his state for at least 10 days.

The Republican governor wasted no time in wiring $1.67 million to Washington overnight so that some of the areas can open as early as today. Rangers and other National Park Service employees will staff the parks as usual.

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