North Carolina

5:26am

Thu September 26, 2013
Arts & Life

Book News: North Carolina County Reverses 'Invisible Man' Ban

Ralph Ellison testified at a Senate Subcommittee hearing in 1966 on the racial problems in big cities.
AP

4:46pm

Fri September 20, 2013
The Two-Way

Document Sheds New Light On The Time The U.S. Almost Nuked Itself

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 4:48 pm

An atomic cloud rises July 25, 1946 during the "Baker Day" blast at Bikini Island in the Pacific.
National Archives Getty Images

"One simple, dynamo-technology, low voltage switch stood between the United States and a major catastrophe."

That is the blunt 1969 assessment of Parker F. Jones, the then supervisor of the nuclear weapons safety department at Sandia National Laboratories, in a newly declassified document that sheds light on a 1961 accident in which the United States almost nuked North Carolina.

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5:19am

Fri September 20, 2013
Arts & Life

Book News: North Carolina County Bans 'Invisible Man'

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 7:24 am

Novelist Ralph Ellison, seen in Feb. 15, 1964.
AP

1:01am

Tue September 3, 2013
Books

For F. Scott And Zelda Fitzgerald, A Dark Chapter In Asheville, N.C.

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 1:30 pm

Zelda Sayre and F. Scott Fitzgerald pose for a photo at the Sayre home in Montgomery, Ala., in 1919, the year before they married.
Bettmann Corbis

Asheville, a mountain town in North Carolina, is known for at least two important native sons: writers Thomas Wolfe, whose 1929 novel Look Homeward, Angel eviscerated some locals, and Charles Frazier, whose 1997 civil war novel Cold Mountain is set in the nearby hills. But there is also a little-known story of another writer — F. Scott Fitzgerald — who, along with his wife Zelda, had devastating connections to the town.

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12:31pm

Wed August 21, 2013
The Two-Way

Journey Of The Ring: Lost In WWII, Now Back With POW's Son

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 4:11 am

The ring that finally found its way home after nearly 70 years. David Cox, an American pilot, traded it for some food while he was a prisoner of war in Germany.
Courtesy of Norwood McDowell
  • David Cox Jr. talks with NPR's Melissa Block about the journey of his father's ring
  • David Cox Jr. talks with NPR's Melissa Block about how his father would have loved getting his ring back

"I can't touch it or pick it up without thinking about him and I can't pick it up without thinking about this journey of the ring."

That's David C. Cox Jr. of North Carolina talking Wednesday about the rather amazing saga of the ring his father had to trade for food in a German prisoner of war camp during World War II — a ring that has now made it back to the Cox family after seven decades.

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