Performing Arts

Courtesy of Amanda Huner

Choir students at Rocky Mountain High School knew, when you were in Barbara Lueck’s class, you were with family.

“We called her ‘Mama Lu’ for a reason,” said Doug Usher, a 2000 Rocky graduate. “She was there for you inside and outside the classroom and you could go to her anytime with anything and she would be there, she would listen. She embodies that spirit of what we all want teachers to be.”

So when her former students found out the beloved choir director had cancer, they knew there was only one thing to do.

Courtesy of Bas Bleu Theatre

The song “Somewhere That’s Green” from the musical “Little Shop of Horrors” is one of Fort Collins actor Jonathan Farwell’s favorites. It was a standard part of his wife, Deb Note-Farwell's, repertoire whenever she was invited to sing.

“And every time I heard it, I cried,” Jonathan said. “So that’s really what happens to me now. I don’t know if worse is the word or maybe better -- to feel what it feels like to miss her that much.”

Courtesy of Kent Kanouse/Flickr-Creative Commons

It might seem like a gamble, but brothers Tyler and Jeremy Fey are betting that Central City is ready to become an arts hub.

A tourist town in the 1970s and ‘80s, the city of about 700 embraced legalized gambling in the ‘90s. In the last few years, business has dwindled, and commercial vacancies have increased.

It’s sad for Jeremy, who remembered visiting the town often growing up.

Works Progress Architecture/Andrew Katz

A new, state-of-the-art indoor music venue is coming to Denver’s rapidly growing River North District, or RiNo. The Mission Ballroom will anchor the new mixed-use North Wynkoop development along Brighton Boulevard.

The new venture is part of a partnership between music promoter AEG Presents Rocky Mountains and real estate developer Westfield Company. The project was announced with a promotional video featuring a virtual tour of the venue, as well as an overview of the plans for North Wynkoop.

Courtesy of Cheyenne Michaels

Katy Williams is used to having to explain her work.

“I’ll tell people I’m a puppeteer and they’re like, ‘Oh, so like The Muppets?’” Williams said. “And I’m like, ‘Yes -- but no.’”

Because what Williams does is so much more than felted fabric.

Courtesy of Kmeron

Kendrick Lamar, Florence + The Machine and Stevie Wonder will headline the inaugural year of Denver’s Grandoozy music festival.

The event kicks off September 14-16 at Overland Park Golf Course. It is expected to draw 30 to 40,000 people daily.

Tickets go on sale beginning at 10 a.m. March 23, 2018 at Grandoozy.com. Pricing starts at $224.50 for general admission three-day tickets and $599.50 for VIP three-day tickets. There will be a layaway plan to allow ticket buyers the option to split the cost of purchase into multiple payments over time.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

You may know Chris Daniels best as the energetic frontman for blues band Chris Daniels & The Kings, but lately it’s other people’s music that’s been on his mind.

Daniels is the new executive director of the Colorado Music Hall of Fame.

Jay Goldman/Creative Commons

In the concert industry, Colorado has long been considered a “flyover state,” but Denver still ranks in the top 10 for the amount of live music.

Stacy Nick / KUNC

When Art Comes to Town: This story is the first in a series as KUNC arts and culture reporter Stacy Nick explores the impact art has on Colorado communities — and the impact those communities have on the art that comes out of them.

Every January for the last 10 years, Claire Beedall and her family have traveled from England to vacation in Breckenridge.

“We come out skiing here normally, but we try and coincide it with the snow sculptures,” Beedall said, referencing the Breckenridge International Snow Sculpting Competition.

Now in its 28th year, the event is an ingrained part of the mountain town’s identity -- almost as much as its slopes.

Joan Marcus/Courtesy of DCPA

When general admission seats for “Hamilton” go on sale Jan. 22 at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, a lot of fans will be online taking their shot at tickets. Unfortunately, they won’t be the only ones.

With such a high-demand show, third-party ticket brokers will also eagerly be looking for ways to get their hands on tickets. Lots of tickets. The brokers use online bots to purchase large blocks of tickets and then resell them, often on websites designed to look like they are affiliated with the venue, said John Ekeberg, executive director of DCPA’s Broadway division.

The first tip-off: an exorbitant price tag.

“If it seems too expensive, there’s a good chance that it is,” Ekeberg said.

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