Poverty

1:57am

Fri June 15, 2012
Law

Legal Help For The Poor In 'State Of Crisis'

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 8:56 am

At Maryland's Legal Aid Bureau in Baltimore, the doors are open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. It serves as a kind of legal emergency room for people who need help but can't afford a lawyer.
Carrie Johnson NPR

Nearly 50 years ago, the Supreme Court ruled that people accused of a crime deserve the right to a defense lawyer, no matter whether they can afford to pay for one. But there's no such guarantee when it comes to civil disputes — like evictions and child custody cases — even though they have a huge impact on people's lives.

For decades, federal and state governments have pitched in to help. But money pressures mean the system for funding legal aid programs for the poor is headed toward a crisis.

A Legal ER

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2:37am

Mon June 11, 2012
Asia

In India, A Different Kind Of Austerity

Originally published on Tue June 12, 2012 5:44 pm

Facing economic woes, India is looking to trim spending - but cutting government services is extremely unpopular. Instead, politicians are targeting foreign travel and meetings at lavish hotels like the Oberoi in Mumbai.
Sajjad Hussain AFP/Getty Images

In Europe, the concept of austerity has meant deep, painful cuts to government spending. In India, however, austerity looks a little different.

India's government has started by reeling in departmental spending on things like hotel space and foreign travel. It may seem like window dressing, but it can be difficult to make deep spending cuts in that country. Many voters see government largesse as a right and usually applaud pork-barrel spending.

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12:44am

Fri April 27, 2012
Education

Teaching The LA Riots At Two City Schools

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 8:22 pm

Smoke rises as fires burn out of control near Vermont Street in Los Angeles on April 30, 1992. Riots erupted after L.A. police officers were acquitted in the beating of black motorist Rodney King.
Paul Sakuma AP

It has been 20 years since four police officers were acquitted in the beating of Rodney King, and L.A. erupted in race-fueled riots. Many in Los Angeles, including students who weren't born when the riots hit in April 1992, are reflecting on those days of anger, looting and destruction, asking why it happened and how to make sure it doesn't happen again.

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3:30pm

Sun April 22, 2012
Economy

Poverty In America: Defining The New Poor

Originally published on Mon April 23, 2012 8:50 am

President Clinton prepares to sign legislation overhauling America's welfare system at the White House Rose Garden on Aug. 22, 1996. Today, the ranks of the nation's poor have swelled to a record 46.2 million — nearly 1 in 6 Americans — as the prolonged pain of the recession leaves millions still struggling and out of work.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Welfare changes in the 1990s helped slash cash benefit rolls, yet the use of food stamps is soaring today. About 15 percent of Americans use food stamps. The program has become what some call the new welfare.

A big reason why is a deal struck between President Clinton and the Republican-controlled Congress in 1996. At that time, the number of Americans who received cash payments — what's often thought of as welfare — was at an all-time high.

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8:15am

Thu February 2, 2012
It's All Politics

Jon Stewart: 'If You're In A Net, Something Has Gone Terribly... Wrong'

Mitt Romney may want to see if there's anything his new Secret Service team can do to protect him from Jon Stewart's comedic barbs.

On The Daily Show Wednesday, after playing the infamous CNN clip in which Romney spoke of not being concerned about the very poor because they have a safety net, or the very rich, Stewart reacted thusly:

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