Privacy

5:29am

Fri June 13, 2014
All Tech Considered

Here's One Big Way Your Mobile Phone Could Be Open To Hackers

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 11:08 am

There is a hole in mobile security that could makes tens of millions of Americans vulnerable.
iStockphoto

Despite the fact that every major Internet provider has added some kind of encryption to its services over the past year, tracking your online traffic is easier than you think.

And you don't have to be the target of the hacker or the NSA for your traffic to be intercepted. There is a hole in mobile security that could make tens of millions of Americans vulnerable.

Unsecure Wi-Fi networks have been a well-known vulnerability in the tech industry for years. They can let even the most unsophisticated hacker capture your traffic and possibly steal your identity.

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3:09am

Tue June 10, 2014
All Tech Considered

Project Eavesdrop: An Experiment At Monitoring My Home Office

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 12:55 pm

If someone tapped your Internet connection, what would they find out about you?
iStockphoto

If someone tapped your Internet connection, what would he find out about you?

It's been just over a year since Edward Snowden became a household name, and his disclosures about the reach and extent of the National Security Agency's online monitoring programs led to headlines around the world.

But one big, basic question remains more or less unanswered: What exactly does the NSA's surveillance reveal?

To try to answer that question, I had my home office bugged.

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2:38pm

Mon May 12, 2014
All Tech Considered

As Drones Fly In Cities And Yards, So Do The Complaints

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 8:25 am

Merrill uses a drone to take aerial shots of Santa Cruz, Calif.
Courtesy of David Merrill

The price of drones is dropping — a decent one could cost you $300 — but the reality of the devices flying around cities and neighborhoods doesn't sit well with a lot of Americans.

Are they just paranoid?

Three months ago, when Michael Kirschner and his wife purchased a new condo in San Francisco, they were not concerned about drones. They fell in love with the unit because of its big picture windows.

"You have a view that reaches all the way out to the Golden Gate Bridge," Kirschner says.

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11:15pm

Sun May 11, 2014
National

Glenn Greenwald: NSA Believes It Should Be Able To Monitor All Communication

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 9:12 am

Glenn Greenwald in April, arriving in the U.S. for the first time since documents were disclosed to him by former intelligence analyst Edward Snowden.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Glenn Greenwald, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who helped to break stories about mass surveillance in the United States, is making more revelations in a new book coming out Tuesday.

In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, Greenwald says one of the more "shocking" things he's found is that the National Security Agency physically intercepted shipments of computer hardware, like routers, switches and servers, to outfit them with surveillance equipment.

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5:31am

Tue April 29, 2014
All Tech Considered

Weighing The Risks Of Warrantless Phone Searches During Arrests

Originally published on Thu May 1, 2014 11:10 am

The Supreme Court is hearing arguments in two cases over whether law enforcement can search cellphones obtained at an arrest without a warrant.
iStockphoto

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Tuesday in two cases testing whether police can search cellphones without a warrant at the time of an arrest, be it for a traffic violation or for a felony.

The Supreme Court has interpreted the Fourth Amendment ban on unreasonable searches to require that police obtain a search warrant from a neutral judge upon a showing that there is probable cause to believe a crime has been committed. The warrant is to specify where the search will be conducted and the evidence being sought.

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