Privacy

3:54pm

Wed October 31, 2012
Law

Drug-Sniffing Dogs Take Center Stage At High Court

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 4:53 pm

Miami-Dade Detective Douglas Bartelt and narcotics detector canine Franky give a demonstration in Miami in 2011.
Alan Diaz AP

The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments in two cases Wednesday testing what, if any, limits there are to the police using drug-sniffing dogs. By the close of two hours of argument, it looked very much as though the court would rule against the use of drug-sniffing dogs without a warrant in one case, but not the other.

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2:25am

Wed October 31, 2012
Law

Can Drug-Sniffing Dog Prompt Home Search?

Originally published on Wed October 31, 2012 6:52 am

Miami-Dade narcotics detector canine Franky, who came out of retirement to give a demonstration, sniffs marijuana in Miami in 2011. Franky's supersensitive nose is at the heart of a question being put to the U.S. Supreme Court: Does a police K-9's sniff outside a house give officers the right to get a search warrant for illegal drugs?
Alan Diaz AP

You can already hear all the likely jokes at the Supreme Court, about the justices going to the dogs. But the issue being argued Wednesday is deadly serious: whether police can take a trained drug-detection dog up to a house to smell for drugs inside, and if the dog alerts, use that to justify a search of the home.

In the case before the court, the four-legged cop was named Franky, and as a result of his nose, his human police partner charged Joelis Jardines with trafficking in more than 25 pounds of marijuana.

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2:18am

Mon October 29, 2012
Law

Surveillance Act Criticized, But Can It Be Fought?

Originally published on Mon October 29, 2012 3:14 am

The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday considers whether to allow a challenge to a federal law that provides for large-scale electronic surveillance of international phone calls and emails. The case is not a direct test of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Rather, it is a test of whether the law can even be challenged in court at all.

How FISA Came To Be

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8:59am

Tue October 2, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

How Some Parents Could Learn Adult Daughters' Birth Control Habits

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 7:53 am

An insurer's note could tip parents to their adult daughter's use of the pill.
iStockphoto.com

The 2010 health law removes one of the big barriers to contraception for many young women: cost. But if they don't feel confident that the care they will receive is confidential, these women may not take advantage of it.

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4:17pm

Wed September 26, 2012
The Two-Way

Some Rental Computer Users Got More Than They Bargained For

Originally published on Thu September 27, 2012 7:12 am

Ever feel like someone is watching you? The Federal Trade Commission finds you could be right — if you've used a rental computer.
iStockphoto

Rent-to-own companies may have a right to use software to track the computers they lease out — and disable them remotely if a customer stops making payments.

But they don't have the right to spy on their customers, which is exactly what the Federal Trade Commission says took place. The agency found that the compromised data included everything from passwords to highly personal images.

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