Race Ethnicity & Culture

1:45am

Wed July 2, 2014
The Race Card Project

A Woman Wrestles With A Disturbing Family Memento

Originally published on Wed July 2, 2014 12:15 pm

Carol Zachary's grandfather, Herbert Fleming, a county auditor, was required to attend Montana's first legal triple-hanging in a barn in Meagher County, Mont., in 1917. Fleming was one of approximately 60 witnesses that day.
Courtesy of Carol Zachary

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris dips into those stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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1:04am

Fri June 13, 2014
StoryCorps

Remembering A Civil Rights Swim-In: 'It Was A Milestone'

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 11:14 am

In June 1964, James Brock dumped acid into the water at the Monson Motor Lodge in St. Augustine, Fla. He was trying to disrupt swimmers who were protesting the hotel's whites-only policy.
Bettmann Corbis

On June 18, 1964, black and white protesters jumped into the whites-only pool at the Monson Motor Lodge in St. Augustine, Fla. In an attempt to force them out, the owner of the hotel poured acid into the pool.

Martin Luther King Jr. had planned the sit-in during the St. Augustine Movement, a part of the larger civil rights movement. The protest — and the owner's acidic response — is largely forgotten today, but it played a role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act, now celebrating its 50th anniversary.

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4:03am

Fri May 23, 2014
Code Switch

'Unmosqued' Examines Muslim Variant Of Unchurched Youth

Originally published on Fri May 23, 2014 9:00 am

Zain Lodhia plays an original song at a Mawlid, a birthday celebration for the Prophet Muhammad. The event was sponsored by the Webb Foundation, a so-called "Third Space" Muslim faith community outside the traditional mosque.
Monique Parsons NPR

There's a new film screening on American college campuses this spring that's sparking lively debate among Muslim students. Unmosqued depicts a younger generation of American Muslims drifting away from Islam, and it argues that mosques bear the blame.

Recently several hundred people gathered at the Webb Foundation to celebrate Mawlid, the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad. The foundation is named after an early American convert to Islam. There's no dome, minaret or even a building. It's known for service projects, good Sunday schools and father-daughter camping trips.

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5:58am

Mon May 19, 2014
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays

Six Words: 'You've Got To Be Taught' Intolerance

Originally published on Tue May 20, 2014 5:46 am

Actors John Kerr and France Nuyen in a scene from the 1958 film South Pacific. The interracial romance between the onstage pair unsettled some audiences.
20th Century Fox Getty Images

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often, NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

Read more

5:58am

Fri May 16, 2014
Education

Before 'Brown V. Board,' Mendez Fought California's Segregated Schools

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 8:51 pm

Sylvia Mendez was a young girl in the 1940s when her parents fought for Latinos to have access to white schools in the California court case Mendez v. Westminster. They won in 1947.
Shereen Marisol Meraji NPR

Sylvia Mendez says the only reason she wanted to go to an all-white school in California's Westminster District in the 1940s was because of its beautiful playground. The school that she and other Latino students were forced to attend didn't have monkey bars or swings.

"I was 9 years old," she says. "I just thought my parents wanted us to go to the nice-looking school."

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