Race Ethnicity & Culture

1:49am

Thu August 8, 2013
Code Switch

Science Rap B.A.T.T.L.E.S. Bring Hip-Hop Into The Classroom

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 10:48 am

Jayda Neor and Kephra Shaw Meredith, seventh-graders from KIPP Bridge middle school in Oakland, Calif., perform a rap song about the discovery of DNA's structure in front of a green screen.
Tom McFadden

This story comes to us from our friends at the science desk. They produced the 7-minute video documentary you see above.

"Modern-day rappers — all they talk about is money, and all these unnecessary and irrelevant topics," says Victoria Richardson, a freshman at Bronx Compass High School. Richardson's rhymes tackle a much less-popular subject: DNA.

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11:17am

Mon August 5, 2013
The Two-Way

15 Years Later, Tawana Brawley Has Paid 1 Percent Of Penalty

Originally published on Mon August 5, 2013 12:32 pm

Tawana Brawley, with the Rev. Al Sharpton, in 1988.
Mark Elias AP

It was 1987 when a black teenager, Tawana Brawley, said she had been raped and kidnapped by a group of white men in Dutchess County, N.Y.

Her story of being attacked, scrawled with racial slurs, smeared with feces and left beside a road wrapped in a plastic bag made front pages across the nation — especially after the Rev. Al Sharpton took up her case.

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1:24am

Mon August 5, 2013
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays

To Join '63 March On Washington: 'Like Climbing A Mountain'

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 7:49 am

A newspaper clipping from The Cincinnati Herald on Sept. 14, 1963, included a picture of Jack Hansan and other members of the Cincinnati delegation.
Courtesy of Jack Hansan

For the Month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream Speech" on Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capitol from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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1:29pm

Thu August 1, 2013
Code Switch

Sikhs Remember Tragedy By Embracing Faith

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 3:48 pm

Worshippers at the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek. The Aug. 5, 2012, shooting tragedy has brought some Sikhs closer to their faith.
Erin Toner WUWM

Every Sunday, hundreds of worshippers descend on the Sikh Temple of Wisconsin in Oak Creek, just south of Milwaukee. They come here to pray and to eat a weekly meal together, called a langar. On Aug. 5, 2012, as women were preparing the meal, a gunman opened fire, killing six people, including the temple president, a priest, fathers and a mother, before turning the gun on himself. Photos of the victims now hang in the lobby of the temple, called a gurdwara.

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3:49pm

Mon July 29, 2013
Code Switch

In Nation's First Black Public High School, A Blueprint For Reform

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:26 pm

Dunbar High School has a notable list of graduates, including the first black presidential Cabinet member, the first black general in the Army and several of the lawyers who argued the Brown v. Board of Education decision.
Courtesy of Chicago Review Press

The nation's first black public high school, Paul Laurence Dunbar High, opened its doors in Washington, D.C., in 1870. But more than 140 years later, Dunbar — like many urban schools — has fallen on hard times. The crumbling, brutalist-style building is often described as a prison, and graduation rates hover around 60 percent.

But it wasn't always that way. Once upon a time, the yearbook read like a Who's Who of black America.

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