Race Ethnicity & Culture

3:41pm

Sun September 23, 2012
Around the Nation

Rising Income Gap Shapes Residential Segregation

Originally published on Mon September 24, 2012 11:20 am

Mechelle Baylor's home in the Shaw area of Washington, D.C., has been in her family since 1929. She says she's seen her neighborhood change a lot as her neighbors move out and higher-income earners move in.
Amy Held NPR

The income gap is receiving much attention lately as more Americans are isolating themselves around "people like us."

More accurately, they surround themselves with people who earn similar incomes, and it is now fueling a rise in residential segregation. One recent study suggests the income gap might be greater today than even during colonial times – even when you account for slavery.

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3:06pm

Sun September 23, 2012
Europe

Poverty, Segregation Fuel Marseille Crime Wave

Originally published on Sun September 23, 2012 3:51 pm

Police climb the stairs in a building on the north side of Marseille, southern France, as part of an operation in January against drug dealing and gun proliferation.
Gerard Julien AFP/Getty Images

Drug and gang violence in Marseille, France's second largest city, has gotten so out of control that one local politician has called for the army to be sent in to restore order.

The proposal shocked the French and President Francois Hollande. Now, the French government is making the city a top priority.

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3:34am

Sat September 22, 2012
History

Harlem Hosts First Strokes Of Emancipation

Originally published on Sat September 22, 2012 10:01 am

Emancipation, a wood engraving by Thomas Nast in 1865. The official Emancipation Proclamation was signed in 1863.
Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Saturday marks the 150th anniversary of a crucial moment in U.S. history. On Sept. 22, 1862, President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, announcing his intention to free the slaves in the states rebelling against the Union.

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6:55am

Wed September 19, 2012
It's All Politics

The End Of WASP-Dominated Politics

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 12:02 pm

The Obamas walk back to the White House after attending Easter service at St. John's Episcopal Church on April 8. President Obama is the only Protestant on either 2012 presidential ticket.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Just looking at Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan, you might not think of them as cultural pioneers. But the Republicans make up the first presidential ticket in history not to feature a Protestant.

Romney is Mormon, Ryan, Catholic. That might not seem like such a big deal — especially when you consider they are running against the first African-American president.

But all of these individuals are emblematic of an enormous shift in both American demographics and political power.

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5:01pm

Tue September 11, 2012
NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century

Racial, Regional Divide Still Haunt Detroit's Progress

Originally published on Tue September 11, 2012 8:20 pm

Part of the wall that was built in 1940 has since been painted over with a mural.
Detroit1701.org Collection maintained at the Univ. of Michigan by Ren Farley and Judy Mullin

For many years — perhaps even decades — Detroit has been the poster child for economic malaise. Adjusting for inflation, per capita income in metro Detroit dropped more than 20 percent between 1999 and 2010.

Some analysts say regional cooperation might have helped keep Detroit above water when the car industry sank, but that entrenched divisions that pit the city against its suburbs, and blacks against whites, have hindered that.

A Deeply Entrenched Regional Divide

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