Race Ethnicity & Culture

3:56pm

Fri August 23, 2013
The Two-Way

Discrimination Suit Dropped Against TV's Paula Deen

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 5:28 pm

Cooking show host Paula Deen in an appearance on Fox & Friends last December.
Slaven Vlasic Getty Images

An agreement has been reached to dismiss a sexual harassment and discrimination suit against Food Network personality Paula Deen and her brother.

The Associated Press reports that a document filed in U.S. District Court in Savannah, Ga., said the parties had reached agreement "without any award or fees to any party."

Lisa Jackson — a former employee of Uncle Bubba's Seafood and Oyster House, a restaurant owned by Deen and her brother, Bubba Hiers — charged that she suffered from sexual harassment and racial discrimination.

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11:58am

Thu August 22, 2013
The Two-Way

King's Dream Is Not Yet Reality, Americans Say In Survey

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 1:01 pm

Under Construction: A recent survey of Americans found that fewer than half believe the U.S. has made substantial progress toward racial equality. Here, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., is boxed in by scaffolding as work is done on it.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Fewer than half of all Americans say the United States has made substantial progress in treating all races equally, according to a new poll released by the Pew Research Center Thursday. The results were announced days before the 50th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s iconic "I Have A Dream" speech on the National Mall.

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12:23pm

Wed August 21, 2013
Code Switch

Summer Of '63: Old Lessons For A New Movement

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 4:38 pm

Participants in the Immigrant Workers Freedom Ride sit on a bus that will travel from Los Angeles to Washington, D.C., Sept. 23, 2003.
J. Emilio Flores Getty Images

All this summer, NPR is looking back to civil rights activism of 1963, marking the 50th anniversary of a number of events that changed our society. From the assassination of civil rights leader Medgar Evers in Mississippi to the March on Washington; NPR is remembering the past and examining how our society has changed.

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3:29am

Fri August 16, 2013
Race

Chinatown's 'White Devil John' Sentenced To 20 Years

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 1:29 pm

John Willis, also known as "White Devil John" in Cantonese, was sentenced to 20 years in prison for money laundering and drug charges.
Jane Collins for NPR

The conviction this week of mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger put an end to one of Boston's highest-profile crime sagas.

Less well-known, though, is the case of John Willis, a white man from Dorchester, Mass., who was sentenced in federal court on Thursday to 20 years in prison for drug trafficking and money laundering.

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3:44pm

Thu August 15, 2013
Code Switch

Bayard Rustin: The Man Who Organized The March On Washington

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 2:03 pm

Activist Bayard Rustin points to a map during a press conference four days ahead of the March on Washington in August 1963.
AP

The trailblazing strategist behind the 1963 March on Washington will this year be posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. That's a long way from the days when civil rights activists counted on Bayard Rustin's hard work, but tried to push him aside because he was gay.

For 60 years, Rustin fought for peace and equal rights — demonstrating, organizing and protesting in the United States and around the world.

'Strategic Nonviolence'

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