Recipes

2:03pm

Thu July 3, 2014
The Salt

Simple Summer Jam Session Calls For Strawberries And Sunshine

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:55 pm

A few jars of strawberry jam bask in the light of what made them: the summer sun.
Christian Grantham Flickr

With the onset of summer comes also a bounty of strawberries. Add to those berries a bit of sugar and plenty of sunlight, and you have a strawberry jam recipe fit for the season's best mornings — with a slice of good toast, of course.

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1:03pm

Thu June 12, 2014
The Salt

A Sweet Solution For Dandelions: Eat 'Em To Beat 'Em

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 7:42 am

Freshly picked weeds, hot from the fryer.
Sarah Miles Flickr

When searching for ingredients to cook with, Irish chef Darina Allen sometimes has only to make a short trip — to her yard. There, she's sure to find a constellation of bright yellow dandelion flowers.

"Where other people see weeds, I see dinner!" she says.

Allen's the founder of the Ballymaloe Cookery School and an advocate of organic farming. She says that with a quick transplant from the yard to the kitchen, the humble dandelion might shed its bad rap.

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1:30am

Wed May 28, 2014
The Salt

Want Your Cheese To Age Gracefully? Cowgirl Creamery's Got Tips

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 9:27 am

Sue Conley (left) and Peggy Smith, co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery, prepare their chilled leek and asparagus soup with creme fraiche and fresh ricotta at Cowgirl Creamery in Point Reyes Station, Calif.
Tim Hussin for NPR

In the world of cheese, much like in the world of wine, the ultimate mark of success is acceptance by the French. That's exactly what happened to Sue Conley and Peggy Smith, co-founders of Cowgirl Creamery in northern California.

In 2010, when they were inducted into the prestigious Guilde des Fromagers, they were among the first wave of American cheesemakers to join its ranks.

Cowgirl Creamery also put out its first cookbook in late 2013.

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2:54pm

Thu May 22, 2014
Found Recipes

Freed From The Sidewalk Cart, This Sauerkraut Goes Global

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 6:21 pm

Don't diss the sauerkraut: It may be a hot dog staple, but it's more versatile than you think.
Courtesy of Edward Lee

Edward Lee thought he knew sauerkraut. The chef for the Louisville, Ky., restaurant 610 Magnolia, grew up in New York City, a place where sauerkraut means one thing: "sidewalk hot dog carts — cheap, bad, overboiled sauerkraut on top of awful kosher hot dogs," he says.

He loved it, as any native New Yorker might, but it was sauerkraut -- boring, safe, standard.

Many years later, after Lee moved to Kentucky, he had a sauerkraut surprise at his then-fiance's house. When she broke out a jar of her mother's homemade sauerkraut, he didn't expect too much.

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10:23am

Wed April 23, 2014
The Salt

Bake Bread Like A Pioneer In Appalachia ... With No Yeast

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 6:10 am

Salt rising bread is a yeastless Appalachian soul food.
Susan Brown and Jenny Bardwell

Growing up in West Virginia in the 1960s and '70s, Susan Brown would have a slice of salt rising bread, toasted, for Saturday morning breakfast. Her grandmother baked the bread with the mysterious and misleading name.

There's little or no salt in the recipe. No yeast, either. The bread rises because of bacteria in the potatoes or cornmeal and the flour that goes into the starter.

The taste is as distinctive as the recipe. Salt rising bread is dense and white, with a fine crumb and cheese-like flavor.

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