Recipes

4:10pm

Thu September 5, 2013
Arts & Life

'Smitten Kitchen' Author On Learning To Love Kale

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 3:21 pm

Food blogger Deb Perelman was initially a kale skeptic — until this Kale Salad With Pecorino And Walnuts changed her mind.
Deb Perelman

Kale has experienced a renaissance in recent years. Once relegated to the sidelines as a mere garnish, the green now appears on 400 percent more restaurant menus than it did four years ago.

But not everyone has bought into the gospel of the vitamin- and mineral-rich green. Even Deb Perelman, who writes the blog and cookbook Smitten Kitchen, was initially a kale skeptic.

Read more

1:05am

Fri August 30, 2013
The Salt

Dumplings Taste Better When Filled With Memories

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:56 am

Just about every culture has a dumpling. For many immigrants and first-generation Americans, dumplings serve as a delicious taste of home and heritage. Pierogis are the Polish take on the form.
Allison Aubrey NPR

Most kids leave Santa cookies. My brother and I would try to bribe him with an extra treat: a couple leftover pierogi from our Christmas Eve dinner.

Instead of sugar plums, pierogi danced in my head. And while I never admitted it in my letter to Santa, I was an accomplished pierogi thief. While they were kept warm on the stove ahead of our guests' arrival, I could lift the cover to the pan that cradled them without making a sound, liberating one to scarf down before my Polish mother walked back into the kitchen. My lips gleamed with a mix of butter and Bonnie Bell lip gloss.

Read more

1:33am

Wed August 28, 2013
The Salt

You Say 'Kubbeh,' I Say 'Kibbeh,' Let's Eat 'Em All Right Now

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 10:33 am

At the Te'amim — or Tastes — cooking camp in Jerusalem, kids learn how to make kubbeh hamusta, a popular regional dumpling from Kurdistan.
Emily Harris NPR

People across the Levant love their dumplings, even if they can't agree on a name. Some say kubbeh; others say kibbeh. In Egypt, you might hear kobeba.

In Jerusalem, there are perhaps as many variations of the kubbeh as there are cultures in the city.

One popular version consists of meat wrapped in bulgur, then deep fried. Dip one in tahini for a crunchy snack.

But at the Te'amim — or Tastes — cooking camp in Jerusalem, chef Udi Shlomi prefers to teach kids to make kubbeh hamusta.

Read more

1:42am

Mon August 26, 2013
The Salt

In the Beginning, There Were ... Dumplings?

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 7:35 am

A potsticker prepared by Chef Scott Drewno at the Washington, D.C., restaurant The Source.
Heather Rousseau for NPR

From Warsaw to Wuhan, people around the world love dumplings. They're tasty little packages that can be made of any grain and stuffed with whatever the locals crave. But where did they come from?

No one knows for sure, but Ken Albala, a food historian at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, Calif., thinks dumplings have been around for a very long time. "Almost without doubt, there are prehistoric dumplings," he says.

Read more

2:07pm

Tue August 20, 2013
The Salt

'Treme' Cookbook Captures The Flavor Of A Show And A City

Originally published on Wed August 21, 2013 9:34 am

Microwave pralines are easier to make than stovetop pralines, and just as tasty.
Ed Anderson Chronicle Books

If you find yourself craving New Orleans food, you could go there and melt in the sweltering heat for a dose of gumbo or praline bacon. Or you could settle in on your couch, as I've been doing, and torture yourself watching reruns of the HBO series Treme. It's set in post-Katrina New Orleans and, along with the music, it puts the city's food on center stage.

Read more

Pages