Republican Party (GOP)

3:51pm

Wed July 10, 2013
Shots - Health News

GOP Says, Why Not Delay That Health Care Law, Like, Forever?

U.S. Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., speaks at a press conference Wednesday on Republican plans to delay enactment of the Affordable Care Act. Looking on are Sens. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and John Cornyn, R-Texas.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Sensing that recent delays in key portions of the Affordable Care Act have caught the Obama administration at a weak point in its rollout of the law, Republicans in Congress are doubling down on their efforts to cripple the measure, at least in the eyes of the public if not in fact.

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3:29pm

Wed July 10, 2013
It's All Politics

Marco Rubio: Poster Boy For The GOP Identity Crisis

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 4:13 pm

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., walks toward the stage as he is introduced at a Faith and Freedom Coalition conference in June.
Charles Dharapak AP

The Republican Party seems like two parties these days. In the Senate, Republicans joined a two-thirds majority to pass an immigration bill. But in the House, Republicans are balking.

Strategist Alex Lundry says it's hard to figure out the way forward when your party's base of power is the House of Representatives.

"One problem we have in the wilderness is that there are a thousand chiefs," he says. "And it is hard to get a party moving when you don't have somebody at the top who is a core leader who can be directive."

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9:17am

Tue July 2, 2013
It's All Politics

Democrats Face The Two States Of Texas: Urban And Rural

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 12:32 pm

Texas is beginning to trend urban (downtown Houston, left), which could be good news for Democrats, who tend not to do well in rural areas like Wise County near Boyd (right).
David J. Phillip (left)/LM Otero (right) AP

2:44pm

Mon July 1, 2013
It's All Politics

Will Texas Become A Presidential Battleground?

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 4:11 pm

Texas was decidedly red on the electoral map in NBC News' "Election Plaza" in New York's Rockefeller Center in 2008. Do Democrats really have a chance to turn it blue in the future?
Mary Altaffer AP

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

With the two parties in Washington gridlocked on immigration, the budget and other issues, it's easy to forget that when it comes to winning presidential elections, one party has a distinct advantage.

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12:29pm

Mon July 1, 2013
It's All Politics

How To Turn A Red State Blue: California Edition

Originally published on Mon July 1, 2013 4:11 pm

Republicans celebrated when California Gov. Pete Wilson was re-elected in 1994. But his divisive campaign led to a backlash, especially among the growing Latino population in the state.
Kevork Djansezian AP

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Democrats who hope to turn Texas from red to blue are looking to California for inspiration.

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