Russia

2:36am

Mon October 27, 2014
Parallels

In Crimea, Many Signs Of Russia, Few Of Resistance

Originally published on Mon October 27, 2014 7:08 am

Russia established the Crimean port of Sevastopol in the 18th century. After the Soviet breakup in 1991, Russia and Ukraine shared the naval base. But Russia has now taken the entire base, including Ukrainian ships.
Max Avdeev for NPR

Morning Edition host David Greene and producer Lauren Migaki traveled to Crimea to see what's changed since Russia sent troops in this spring and shortly afterward annexed the territory despite widespread international criticism. Their stories will be on air and online this week.

We're traveling through flat farmland on a two-lane road in the far north of Crimea, when suddenly it's interrupted by a checkpoint. Actually, Russia now considers it the border, a physical reminder of the new divide between Russia and Ukraine — and the West.

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4:41pm

Tue October 14, 2014
All Tech Considered

Microsoft Windows Flaw Let Russian Hackers Spy On NATO, Report Says

Microsoft says it's patching a Windows security flaw cited in a report on alleged spying by Russian hackers.
Ted S. Warren AP

A group of hackers, allegedly from Russia, found a fundamental flaw in Microsoft Windows and exploited it to spy on Western governments, NATO, European energy companies and an academic organization in the United States.

That's according to new research from iSight Partners, a Dallas-based cybersecurity firm.

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3:11pm

Mon September 15, 2014
Business

With Turmoil Roiling Abroad, Why Aren't Oil Prices Bubbling Up?

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 6:32 am

A soldier guards a pipe en route to the Kawergosk Refinery near Irbil, the capital of the autonomous Kurdish region of northern Iraq, in July. Fighting in northern Iraq forced the closure of the country's largest oil refinery, Baiji, and cut production from the Kirkuk oil field this summer.
Safin Hamed AFP/Getty Images

The price of oil has been falling — a drop that you may already have noticed at the pump. Gasoline prices have dropped noticeably since June, and oil is now well below $100 a barrel.

That decline has happened even as conflicts have flared in or near oil-producing regions. Normally, oil prices are expected to spike higher amid turmoil — so why have they been trending lower?

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3:11am

Thu May 29, 2014
It's All Politics

More Diplomacy, Fewer Military Missions: 5 Obama Statements Explained

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 10:13 am

President Obama and superintendent of the Military Academy, Lt. Gen. Robert L. Caslen Jr., take the Pledge of Allegiance at the West Point graduation ceremony on Wednesday. In an interview with NPR, President Obama said U.S. foreign policy should focus more on diplomatic efforts than on large-scale military operations.
Peter Foley EPA/Landov

In an interview with NPR, President Obama says now is an appropriate time to step up aid to moderate Syrian rebels. But most of his foreign policy aims are geared toward expanding diplomatic efforts in a host of regional disputes.

Obama has come under fire from critics who say he has failed to show American leadership on issues ranging from Syria's civil war to Ukraine's crisis to China's growing clout in Asia.

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1:22am

Tue May 27, 2014
The Salt

How Soviet Kitchens Became Hotbeds Of Dissent And Culture

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 12:45 pm

A typical Russian kitchen inside an apartment built during the early 1960s, when Nikita Khrushchev led the Soviet Union — what later became known as Khrushchev apartments.
Courtesy of The Kitchen Sisters

When Nikita Khrushchev emerged as the leader of the Soviet Union after Stalin's death in 1953, one of the first things he addressed was the housing shortage and the need for more food. At the time, thousands of people were living in cramped communal apartments, sharing one kitchen and one bathroom with sometimes up to 20 other families.

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