Russia

5:23am

Fri December 28, 2012
The Two-Way

U.S. Families Stunned By Russia's Ban On Adoptions

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 7:37 am

Children at an orphanage in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don earlier this month.
Vladimir Konstantinov Reuters /Landov

As expected, Russian President Vladimir Putin today signed a law "that bans Americans from adopting Russian children and imposes other measures in retaliation for new U.S. legislation meant to punish Russian human rights abusers," Reuters reports.

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3:06am

Fri December 28, 2012
Europe

Russia's Putin Signs Controversial Adoption Bill

Originally published on Fri December 28, 2012 11:42 am

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a measure into law that would ban Americans from adopting Russian children.

Russia's parliament had overwhelmingly approved the ban, which was designed as retaliation for a new U.S. law that sanctions Russian officials accused of human rights violations.

The adoption ban stirred outrage in Russia as well as the United States.

An online petition against the measure rapidly collected more than 100,000 signatures in Russia.

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6:21am

Thu December 27, 2012
The Two-Way

Putin Signals He Will Sign Law Banning U.S. Adoptions Of Russian Children

Originally published on Thu December 27, 2012 12:55 pm

Russian President Vladimir Putin.
Alexi Nikolsky AFP/Getty Images
  • From the NPR Newscast: Michele Kelemen reports.

1:33pm

Mon December 17, 2012
The Salt

Wine And Food May Rekindle Love Lost Between Russia And Georgia

Originally published on Thu December 20, 2012 12:10 am

Eating lamb dumplings called khinkali at a table in Tbilisi, Georgia.
ostromentsky Flickr.com

It's a big day in the religious and culinary calendar of the Republic of Georgia. Georgian Orthodox believers observe Dec. 17 as St. Barbara's Day, in honor of an early Christian martyr. And they typically mark the occasion by eating a type of stuffed bread called lobiani, baked with a filling of boiled beans with coriander and onions.

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1:04pm

Mon December 17, 2012
Shots - Health News

Scientists Look For New Drugs In Skin Of Russian Frog

Originally published on Tue December 18, 2012 11:01 am

Before the advent of refrigeration, Russians had a neat trick for keeping their milk from spoiling. They'd drop a live frog in the milk bucket.

The Russians weren't sure how this amphibian dairy treatment worked, but they were convinced it did.

Since then, researchers have discovered that the goo some frogs secrete through their skin has antibacterial and antifungal properties.

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