Science

5:16am

Sat April 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Lights Off, Eyes Open: New Moon Darkens Skies For Meteor Shower

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 8:58 pm

A composite of Lyrids over Huntsville, Ala., in 2009. This year, the meteor shower will hit its peak before dawn Sunday morning.
Danielle Moser/MSFC NASA

Tonight is a good night for a meteor shower. The Lyrids aren't known for their flashy shows, but this year they're getting help from a new moon.

The dark skies will be "ideal for meteor watching from the ground," NASA says.

Kelly Beatty, senior contributing editor for Sky and Telescope magazine, tells Weekend Edition host Scott Simon the best views are from the darkest places.

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12:53pm

Fri April 20, 2012
The Salt

For Most Of Human History, Being An Omnivore Was No Dilemma

Gorillas are fine with being herbivores, like this one at a Seattle zoo. But humans evolved as omnivores. Is diet destiny?
Ted S. Warren AP

If diet is destiny, then modern humans should thank our ancestors for their ability to eat just about anything.

Two new studies peek into the distant past to try to figure out just how big a role food played in human evolution. One says that eating meat made it possible for early human mothers to wean babies earlier and have more children.

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12:12pm

Fri April 20, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Monster-Sized Rabbits Discovered; Sadly, They Can't Hop

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 9:41 am

5:29am

Fri April 20, 2012

8:11am

Thu April 19, 2012
The Two-Way

Spring Cleaning Aboard Intrepid Makes Room For Enterprise

Originally published on Thu April 19, 2012 10:21 am

A military band plays as the Space Shuttle Discovery (R), and the Space Shuttle Enterprise (L), sit nose to nose, during an event at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center April 19, 2012 in Chantilly, Virginia.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

UPDATE at 12p.m. EST:

The Space Shuttles Discovery and Enterprise stood nose-to-nose at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Stephen F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va., during a special event today to honor Discovery at its new home.

The Associated Press reports:

Astronauts including former Sen. John Glenn will help deliver Discovery to its retirement as an artifact representing the 30-year shuttle program.

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