Science

2:00pm

Thu March 15, 2012
The Two-Way

First Neutrino Message Sent Through Rock; Could One Travel Back In Time?

What if we could shoot a message through the center of the planet and back in time?
NASA

"Researchers from the University of Rochester and North Carolina State University have for the first time sent a message using a beam of neutrinos — nearly massless particles that travel at almost the speed of light," U of R reports.

And they pushed the message — which simply spelled out the world "Neutrino" — through "240 meters of stone" (787 feet).

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12:12pm

Wed March 14, 2012
The Two-Way

Global Warming Could Cause More Frequent Flooding For 3.7 Million In U.S.

According to the report, by 2050, there is a 1 in 6 chance a storm could force water above the 4 foot level. That would mean most of South Florida would be under water.
Climate Centeral

According to new research, 3.7 million Americans who live at elevations close to high tide could face more frequent flooding because of the sea rise caused by global warming.

The New York Times reports:

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2:58pm

Tue March 13, 2012
Science

Tornado Tech: What If Dorothy Had A Smartphone?

Originally published on Thu March 15, 2012 11:44 am

This May 3, 1999, funnel became the F-5 storm that damaged thousands of buildings in central Okahoma. University of Oklahoma storm chasers and observers are anticipating the annual tornado season as it approaches the central part of the country.
J. Pat Carter AP

For many, the only way they learn a tornado is approaching are sirens. In the spring and summer, tornado sirens go off a lot more when twisters roar across Alabama, which has been hit by 900 since 2000, accounting for a quarter of all U.S. tornado deaths.

"I am still surprised that so many people rely on just one source of getting warned, and that has to change," said Jim Stefkovich, meteorologist in charge of the Birmingham office of the National Weather Service.

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1:57pm

Mon March 12, 2012
Europe

For Russia's Troubled Space Program, Mishaps Mount

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 7:56 pm

Russia's unmanned Progress space freighter, headed for the International Space Station, blasts off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, Oct. 30, 2011. A string of mission failures has raised concerns over the reliability of Russia's space program.
STR Reuters /Landov

Russia was once the world leader in space exploration, but its space program has suffered a string of costly and embarrassing mishaps over the past year.

NASA says Russia is still a trustworthy partner, but critics say the once-proud program is corrupt and mismanaged — good at producing excuses, but not results.

The Memorial Space Museum in Moscow showcases the achievements of the Soviet Union's space program.

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9:25am

Mon March 12, 2012
The Two-Way

Venus, Jupiter, Prepare For A Heavenly Date

Venus-Jupiter conjunctions are fairly special events, occurring roughly every 13 months.
AP

If you've had your eye on the western sky after sundown for the last several nights, you've been witness to a breathtaking sight. The two brightest planets, Venus and Jupiter, have been moving (at least from our perspective) ever closer.

On Thursday night, the two planets will line up in conjunction. Venus is about twice as bright as Jupiter, but they are both unmistakable – just look for the bright orbs in the west.

As Space.com writes:

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