Science

5:30am

Tue December 24, 2013
Space

On Anniversary Of Apollo 8, How The 'Earthrise' Photo Was Made

Originally published on Wed December 25, 2013 5:24 am

The iconic "Earthrise" photo taken by astronaut Bill Anders through a window on the Apollo 8 command module on Dec. 24, 1968.
Bill Anders NASA

The first humans to catch a glimpse of the Earth rising over the moon nearly missed seeing it at all, let alone capturing the snapshot that became one of the most iconic photos of the 20th century.

NASA has released an animation commemorating the 45th anniversary of Apollo 8, the first manned mission to orbit the moon. The famous "Earthrise" photo was taken on Christmas Eve 1968.

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5:00am

Mon December 2, 2013
Agriculture

Under The Microscope: Microbes Can Help Farmers

Researchers at chemical company BASF are working to harness bacteria and microbes for beneficial purposes.
Credit Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Farmers and scientists have long understood that what lives beneath the soil affects how crops grow. Often, they work to fight plant diseases—warding off infectious viruses and damaging fungi, for example. But now some microbiologists are focused on how to harness the good things microbes can do, with the goal of increasing farmers’ yields and diminishing their dependence on chemical inputs.

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10:18am

Mon November 18, 2013
Space

VIDEO: Watch CU Boulder’s MAVEN Launch To Mars

Screen capture from NASA livestream of MAVEN launch.
NASA

6:16am

Thu November 14, 2013
Colorado Flood

Colorado Flood Offers Data Goldmine To Scientists

State Climatologist Nolan Doesken works in his Fort Collins office.
Grace Hood KUNC

The rainfall that led to September’s floods in Colorado has been described as “biblical.” State Climatologist Nolan Doesken is trying to quantify that description.

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3:52pm

Mon November 11, 2013
Science

Why Typhoon Haiyan Caused So Much Damage

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:13 pm

This map from the NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory shows the amount of heat energy available to Typhoon Haiyan between Oct. 28 and Nov. 3. Darker purple indicates more available energy. Typhoons gain their strength by drawing heat out of the ocean. The path of the storm is marked with the black line in the center of the image.
NOAA Environmental Visualization Laboratory

The deadly typhoon that swept through the Philippines was one of the strongest ever recorded. But storms nearly this powerful are actually common in the eastern Pacific. Typhoon Haiyan's devastation can be chalked up to a series of bad coincidences.

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