Space

9:15am

Thu August 29, 2013
Science

Are We Martians? Scientist Says We Just Might Be

Mars: Our "home" planet?
NASA Getty Images

As Adam Frank has said over on the 13.7 blog, "Earth and Mars have been swapping spit (astrobiologically speaking) for eons ... [and] it is entirely possible we were Earth's first alien invasion."

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10:44am

Sat August 24, 2013
The Two-Way

Tons Of Molten Glass Go Into Making Mirror For Giant Telescope

Originally published on Sat August 24, 2013 2:08 pm

An artist's concept of the completed Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT)
Giant Magellan Telescope

Technicians on Saturday are set to cast 20 tons of glass for the third of seven ultra-precise primary mirrors that will make up the 72-foot Giant Magellan Telescope, scheduled for completion in northern Chile's arid Atacama Desert in 2020.

The parabolic mirror will be cast at the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory Mirror Lab. The molten borosilicate, made by the Ohara Corporation, will be spun cast at 2140 degrees Fahrenheit.

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8:00am

Thu August 22, 2013
Science

Comet Flies Into The Sun, Goes Out In A Blaze Of Glory

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 12:13 pm

Like Icarus, the mythological character who plunged to his death after flying too close to the sun, a comet took a solar swan dive earlier this week. NASA has captured its final moments on video.

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12:40am

Mon August 19, 2013
Space

Has Voyager 1 Left The Solar System?

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 12:52 pm

This artist rendering provided by NASA shows Voyager 1 at the edge of the solar system.
AP

The Voyager 1 spacecraft launched in 1977 on a mission to Jupiter and Saturn. It kept on going. Today it's billions of miles from Earth, and scientists have been predicting it will soon leave the solar system.

NPR has been on Voyager watch since at least 2003, when longtime science correspondent Richard Harris provided this warning of Voyager's impending departure.

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7:22am

Sat August 17, 2013
Science

NASA: Meteor In Russia Threw Up Globe-Girdling Plume Of Debris

Originally published on Sat August 17, 2013 6:19 pm

A meteor trail is seen above a residential apartment block in the Urals city of Chelyabinsk on Feb. 15.
AFP/Getty Images

The bus-sized meteor that slammed into Russia in February, causing a massive shock-wave and injuring hundreds of people, sent a plume of dust into the stratosphere that circled the globe in just four days and lingered for months, NASA says.

The Feb. 15 meteor at Chelyabinsk near Russia's southern border with Kazakhstan measured 60 feet across and weighed 12,000 tons. It detonated 15 miles above the city.

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