Space

3:22pm

Mon August 6, 2012
Space

Curiosity Is On Mars, Now What?

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 4:44 pm

Joe Palca describes the mood of NASA Mars scientists in the wake of the landing overnight, what the latest pictures and data are from the surface of the red planet and what mission scientists are going to do next with Curiosity.

11:23am

Mon August 6, 2012
The Two-Way

Spectacular: The Descent Of Curiosity As Seen From NASA's Mars Orbiter

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 12:24 pm

The Mars rover Curiosity.
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

This photograph brings some perspective to the amazing feat of landing a small vehicle on Mars:

The picture was taken by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter just as the spacecraft carrying Curiosity deployed its parachute. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment at The University of Arizona, which released the image, explains:

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5:03am

Mon August 6, 2012
Around the Nation

Curiosity Captivates Time Square Crowd

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 11:02 am

2:33am

Mon August 6, 2012
NPR Story

NASA's Curiosity Lands On Red Planet

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 11:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

They were pretty cheerful at NASA this morning after an unmanned vehicle set down on the surface of Mars.

JOHN HOLDREN: If anybody has been harboring doubts about the status of U.S. leadership in space, well, there's a one ton automobile-size piece of American ingenuity...

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING AND APPALUSE)

HOLDREN: ...and it's sitting on the surface of Mars right now, and it should certainly put any such doubts to rest.

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10:28pm

Sun August 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Mars Rover Pulls Off High-Wire Landing

Originally published on Mon August 6, 2012 4:26 am

An artist's rendering shows a rocket-powered descent stage lowering the one-ton Curiosity rover to the Mars surface.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

The best place to stand in the entire solar system at 1:14 a.m. ET Monday was about 150 million miles away, at the bottom of Gale Crater near the equator of the Red Planet.

Looking west around mid-afternoon local time, a Martian bystander would have seen a rocket-powered alien spacecraft approach and then hover about 60 feet over the rock-strewn plain between the crater walls and the towering slopes of nearby Mount Sharp.

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