StoryCorps

1:39am

Fri June 20, 2014
StoryCorps

Inheriting A Rare Skin Condition, And The Ability To Laugh About It

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 7:03 am

On a visit to StoryCorps, Cheri Lindsay, 25, and Phillip Lindsay, 52, discussed a rare skin condition they share, and how they both have coped.
StoryCorps

People with vitiligo gradually lose pigment in their skin, often in patches that appear randomly and grow over time.

But that wasn't the case for Cheri Lindsay. The white pigment on her skin spread rapidly across her body and around her eyes, "like a mask," over the past four years, she says.

She imagines that she's dealt with it better than most, in part because of the example set by her father.

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1:04am

Fri June 13, 2014
StoryCorps

Remembering A Civil Rights Swim-In: 'It Was A Milestone'

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 11:14 am

In June 1964, James Brock dumped acid into the water at the Monson Motor Lodge in St. Augustine, Fla. He was trying to disrupt swimmers who were protesting the hotel's whites-only policy.
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On June 18, 1964, black and white protesters jumped into the whites-only pool at the Monson Motor Lodge in St. Augustine, Fla. In an attempt to force them out, the owner of the hotel poured acid into the pool.

Martin Luther King Jr. had planned the sit-in during the St. Augustine Movement, a part of the larger civil rights movement. The protest — and the owner's acidic response — is largely forgotten today, but it played a role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act, now celebrating its 50th anniversary.

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2:00am

Fri June 6, 2014
StoryCorps

From Father To Son, Life Lessons Passed Down Through Generations

Originally published on Fri June 6, 2014 9:09 am

Thompson Williams with his son, Kiamichi-tet Williams. Thompson remembers his father, Melford Williams, as someone who "could swear with the best of them" but was never angry with anyone.
StoryCorps

Melford Williams, a World War II veteran and tribal leader with the Caddo Nation, raised eight kids during the 1950s and '60s. He died in 1978, and his grandson, Kiamichi-tet Williams, never got a chance to meet him.

On a visit to StoryCorps in Denver, Kiamichi-tet asked his dad, Thompson Williams, about his grandfather.

"He wasn't the biggest guy, but people reacted to him like he was [a] giant," Thompson says. His father was a kindhearted man who wasn't afraid to cry, Thompson says.

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1:04am

Fri May 30, 2014
StoryCorps

Once Forbidden, Books Become A Lifeline For A Young Migrant Worker

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 11:33 am

On a visit to StoryCorps, Storm Reyes told her son, Jeremy Hagquist, about growing up as a farm laborer. Reyes eventually went to night school and worked in a library for more than 30 years.
StoryCorps

In the late 1950s, when she was just 8 years old, Storm Reyes began picking fruit as a full-time farm laborer for less than $1 per hour. Storm and her family moved often, living in Native American migrant worker camps without electricity or running water.

With all that moving around, she wasn't allowed to have books growing up, Storm tells her son, Jeremy Hagquist, on a visit to StoryCorps in Tacoma, Wash.

"Books are heavy, and when you're moving a lot you have to keep things just as minimal as possible," she says.

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5:49am

Sat May 24, 2014
StoryCorps

After Serving In Iraq And Afghanistan, A New Mission: Healing

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 8:01 am

Jon Meadows was deployed to Iraq in 2006 and to Afghanistan in 2012. He and his wife, Melissa, have had to cope with the consequences of the traumatic brain injury he suffered in Afghanistan.
StoryCorps

StoryCorps' Military Voices Initiative records stories from members of the U.S. military who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

On Staff Sgt. Jon Meadows' first deployment to Iraq, one of his friends, Staff Sgt. William Beardsley, said he wanted to go on a mission in Jon's place.

Jon agreed — and Beardsley died on that mission.

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