SuperPAC

3:54pm

Thu June 7, 2012
It's All Politics

There's More Secret Money In Politics; Justice Kennedy Might Be Surprised

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 4:39 pm

Justice Anthony Kennedy, who wrote the Citizens United opinion saying that corporations can pay for ads expressly promoting or attacking political candidates.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Federal election law has required the public disclosure of campaign donors for nearly 40 years.

But this year, outside groups are playing a powerful role in the presidential election. And some of them disclose nothing about their donors. That's despite what the Supreme Court said in its controversial Citizens United ruling two years ago.

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9:03am

Mon June 4, 2012
Politics

Big Money And The Ballot Box

Originally published on Tue August 7, 2012 1:31 pm

Charles Mann Photography iStockphoto.com

You wouldn't think politicians would have any trouble raising enough money these days. The presidential race is expected to be a billion-dollar affair, and spending records have been shattered at the congressional level.

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3:59pm

Fri June 1, 2012
Money & Politics

Why Political Ads In 2012 May All Look Alike

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 4:48 pm

Screen grabs of four separate ads from four different political groups critical of President Obama's handling of Solyndra, the failed solar-panel maker. Clockwise from top left, the ads are from: Americans for Prosperity, MittRomney.com, American Crossroads and Crossroads GPS.

Among the biggest advertisers in the presidential campaign is a group that says it doesn't do political advertising: Crossroads GPS.

Crossroads GPS — which stands for Grassroots Policy Strategies — was co-founded by Republican strategist Karl Rove. It and others like it enable wealthy donors to finance attack ads while avoiding the public identification they would face if they gave to more overtly political committees.

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4:45pm

Thu May 31, 2012
It's All Politics

John Edwards' Might've Walked But Trial Still A Warning For Politicians

Originally published on Fri June 1, 2012 4:48 pm

Former Democratic U.S. Sen. John Edwards (center) and his daughter Cate Edwards leave the federal court Thursday.
Sara D. Davis Getty Images

With a not guilty verdict on one count and the jury deadlocked on five others, it appears John Edwards' federal trial on campaign-finance charges ended with a whimper, certainly from the Justice Department's point of view.

At first blush, it can be argued that how the trial of the former U.S. senator from North Carolina ended may do little to deter politicians. They'll still be able to go forward and rake in money from supporters and, with some sleight of hand, spend that cash on practically anything.

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2:26pm

Tue May 29, 2012

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