Texas

6:41am

Sun April 21, 2013
Law

Thirsty States Take Water Battle To Supreme Court

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 11:39 am

A dispute over Texas' access to the Kiamichi River, which is located in Oklahoma, has started a longer legal battle that is headed to the Supreme Court.
Joe Wertz for NPR

On Tuesday, Oklahoma and Texas will face off in the U.S. Supreme Court. The winner gets water. And this is not a game.

The court will hear oral arguments in the case of Tarrant Regional Water District v. Herrmann, et al. The case pits Oklahoma against Texas over rights to water from the river that forms part of the border between them. Depending on how the court decides, it could impact interstate water-sharing agreements across the country.

Keeping Up With Texas

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5:53pm

Sat April 20, 2013
The Two-Way

First Residents Allowed To Return To Damaged Homes In West, Texas

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 5:55 pm

Debby Keel holds her grandchild, Kennedy, as Texas Highway Patrol officers record the entry of residents who are allowed to return to their homes near the site of the April 17 fertilizer plant blast in West, Texas.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

In West, Texas, some of the town's citizens whose homes were damaged by Wednesday night's massive fertilizer plant explosion returned to their homes Saturday afternoon, after authorities declared parts of the area safe. But a curfew is in place, and other areas close to the blast remain off-limits.

From West, NPR's Sam Sanders filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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3:21am

Sat April 20, 2013
Around the Nation

Officials Seek Answers In Aftermath Of Deadly Plant Explosion

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 2:47 pm

An explosion leveled a fertilizer plant in West, Texas, on Wednesday. The blast killed 14 people, injured more than 200 others and damaged or completely destroyed at least 80 homes.
Charlie Riedel AP

With the house-to-house search over and the living and dead largely accounted for, the town of West, Texas, began the transition from shock and disbelief to communal grieving.

On Friday night, mourners gathered at St. Mary Church of the Assumption to remember the dead. Many of the dead were first responders who were fighting a roaring fire for 30 minutes before the explosion, which was felt 80 miles away in Fort Worth.

Texas Sen. John Cornyn caused a stir when he suggested that there might be many more people missing than thought.

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3:21am

Sat April 20, 2013
Around the Nation

Two Decades Later, Some Branch Davidians Still Believe

Originally published on Mon October 28, 2013 3:15 pm

Flames engulf the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas, on April 20, 1993. A 51-day standoff at the compound ended in a fire and the deaths of about 80 sect members, including two dozen children.
Susan Weems AP

Twenty years ago, federal agents clashed with David Koresh's Branch Davidian community near Waco, Texas. The standoff ended with a raid and fire that killed some 80 people. It's remembered as one of the darkest chapters in American law enforcement history.

Two decades later, some of the Branch Davidians who survived the raid are still believers, while a new church group has moved onto the land.

The Raid

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11:32am

Fri April 19, 2013
Strange News

Explosions In The News Hit Home For Boston Runner From Texas

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

If you think this has been an unbelievable week of news, try telling it to Joe Berti. Mr. Berti traveled to Boston for that city's marathon and crossed the finish line seconds before the first bomb exploded. He was OK and he went home to Texas, where he was close enough to a fertilizer plant to see it explode on Wednesday night. Some people might feel star-crossed at that point, but Mr. Berti considers himself lucky.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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