Theater

5:24am

Thu January 30, 2014
Arts & Life

Cowboys In Love: 'Brokeback Mountain' Saddles Up For Opera

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 12:38 pm

Tom Randle (left) and Daniel Okulitch in the opera Brokeback Mountain.
Javier del Real Courtesy of the artist

In 2005, the film Brokeback Mountain broke ground as a major motion picture portraying a love story about two men: a pair of young cowboys, Ennis and Jack, in the 1960s.

They fall in love during a summer spent tending sheep in the isolation of a fictional mountain in Wyoming. They spend the rest of the film — and their lives — grappling with a love that they have to keep secret.

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6:47am

Thu January 23, 2014
Arts District

'The Whipping Man' Is Emblematic Of Curious' Approach To Theater

The challenges of life after the Civil War are explored in 'The Whipping Man,' currently on stage at Curious Theatre Company. Pictured are actors Laurence Curry and Sean Scrutchins.
Michael Ensminger, courtesy of Curious Theatre.

On the heels of the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation, Curious Theatre Company has mounted The Whipping Man, a play that looks at the painful legacy of slavery in post-Civil War Richmond, Va.

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6:53am

Fri January 3, 2014
Theater

Don't Call Him Theo: Malcolm-Jamal Warner On Life After 'Cosby'

Malcolm-Jamal Warner plays Dr. John Prentice in Arena Stage's production of Guess Who's Coming to Dinner.
Amy Ta NPR

Actor Malcolm-Jamal Warner is best-known for the role he played in the '80s, as Theo Huxtable on The Cosby Show. He's so well-known for that role, in fact, that even now — at age 43 — he still gets called by the wrong name.

"People kind of have a misconception, because when someone calls me Theo and I correct them, say, 'No, my name is Malcolm,' they think I have an attitude about it and I don't want to be associated with the show," Warner explains to NPR's David Green.

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9:12am

Thu October 3, 2013
The Two-Way

How Do You Get Paid $400,000 At Carnegie Hall? Be A Stagehand

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 11:04 am

In November 2004, the Grand Ole Opry came to Carnegie Hall.
Paul Hawthorne Getty Images

(Update at 1 p.m. ET, Oct. 4: Click here for an important development — management and the stagehands have reached a deal.)

Our original post:

Carnegie Hall's opening night gala was canceled Wednesday because of a strike by stagehands.

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3:59pm

Tue October 1, 2013
Arts & Life

Chronicle Of A Death Foretold: New York City Opera Shuts Its Doors

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 4:16 pm

The New York City Opera let its final curtain fall Saturday night at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in a production of Anna Nicole by Mark-Anthony Turnage.
Stephanie Berger

This morning the New York City Opera announced that it was declaring bankruptcy and ceasing operations. Dubbed "The People's Opera" by Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia when it was founded 70 years ago, the company was meant as an alternative to the richer Metropolitan Opera. It's the place where exciting young singers like Beverly Sills and Placido Domingo made their New York debuts and where innovative productions of new operas premiered.

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