University of Colorado (CU)

5:00am

Tue August 19, 2014
Climate Change

What 13,000 Dead Grasshoppers Can Tell Us About Climate Change

Cesar Nufio shows red mites on a grasshopper found at one of his research sites. Nufio has surveyed and collected grasshoppers at these sites for nine years, replicating the work of Gordon Alexander.
Stephanie Paige Ogburn KUNC

Cesar Nufio is holding a box of dead grasshoppers. The insects, precisely pinned, with miniscule labels affixed beneath them, march down the box in neat, dark lines.

The grasshoppers are just a sampling of a 50-year-old set of 13,000 grasshoppers that Nufio, an entomologist at the University of Colorado, is using to learn about climate change. Until the scientist happened upon them about a decade ago, this collection was nearly forgotten – stored in 250 wooden boxes atop a shelf. Ever since finding the collection, Nufio has been piecing together the story of the lost grasshoppers, and is using them to understand how the change in the area's climate is affecting the insects.

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5:00am

Thu August 14, 2014
Wildlife

Colorado Wildlife Officials Right Trout Wrong

CU-Boulder Professor Andrew Martin and Senior Research Associate Jessica Metcalf release endangered greenback cutthroat trout into Zimmerman Lake west of Fort Collins, Colo. on Aug 8.
Glenn Asakawa University of Colorado

A few years ago, wildlife biologists responsible for protecting and stocking a rare, native Colorado fish – the greenback cutthroat trout – learned they'd been saving the wrong fish.

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9:50am

Sat August 2, 2014
Wildfires

Colorado Homes Most Vulnerable To Wildfires

The Black Forest Fire was the most destructive in Colorado's history.
Credit USDA / inciweb.org

Colorado residents are more vulnerable than any other state in U.S. when it comes to potential damage or destruction from wildfires, with 83,174 homes located in areas with high-severity risk.

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5:00am

Tue July 29, 2014
Environment

Hiking In The Ozone, And Learning About It Too

A CairClip, about the size of a 35mm film canister, is a portable ozone sensor that can be early carried -- including on this hike in Boulder.
Stephanie Paige Ogburn KUNC

5:00am

Mon July 14, 2014
Environment

The Plants In This Garden Tell You When The Air Is Dirty

A tulip poplar leaf with ozone damage.
Danica Lombardozzi National Center for Atmospheric Research

What if you could look at the plants in your garden in order to learn if the air around you is clean or dirty?

At the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, scientists have planted a garden that does just that.

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