U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

5:00am

Thu October 31, 2013
Agriculture

Dreaming Beyond The Slaughterhouse

Binh Hua (left) and My Nguyen, both 18, work in the Garden City Community College chemistry lab. The two best friends graduated from high school in three years and after community college, plan to go on to universities.
Credit Peggy Lowe / Harvest Public Media

6:00am

Sun October 6, 2013
Health

WIC Funding Only Through October

A grocery store sign notifies shoppers about acceptance of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) voucher in August 1983.
National Archives and Records Administration

12:06pm

Thu October 3, 2013
Agriculture

Government Shutdown Slows USDA

The USDA headquarters in Washington D.C.
Credit brittreints/Flickr

The U.S. Department of Agriculture was forced to send home tens of thousands of employees because of Tuesday’s government shutdown. As a result, the agriculture department and its nearly two dozen agencies are operating at limited capacity – or not at all.

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10:22am

Thu October 3, 2013
The Salt

How's The Sausage Made? These Folks Really Want To Share The Knowledge

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 11:45 am

Brent Gentry of Underground Meats rotates a coppa. Underground Meats is behind a new project that aims to lower the barrier to entry for would-be artisanal meat producers by making it easier for them to craft food safety plans.
Emily Julka Courtesy of Underground Meats

With the current bloom of artisanal small-batch producers across the country, you'd think that all you need to start up a new food business is a good idea and a lot of gumption. And for the most part, that's true. But when it comes to artisanal producers working with meat, you also need something else: a Hazards Analysis and Critical Control Points plan. Or, if you will, a HACCP.

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3:59pm

Thu September 26, 2013
The Salt

Doctors Say Changes In Wheat Do Not Explain Rise Of Celiac Disease

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 10:09 am

About 40 years ago wheat breeders introduced new varieties of wheat that helped farmers increase their grain yields. But scientists say those varieties aren't linked to the rise in celiac disease.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Wheat has been getting a bad rap lately.

Many folks are experimenting with the gluten-free diet, and a best-selling book called Wheat Belly has helped drive a lot of the interest.

"Wheat is the most destructive thing you could put on your plate, no question," says William Davis, a cardiologist in Milwaukee, Wis., who authored the book.

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