U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

3:05pm

Thu June 27, 2013
Shots - Health News

How Head Injuries Seem To Affect The Risk For Stroke

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 1:47 pm

The cause of strokes in younger people remains largely a mystery.
iStockphoto.com

Twenty percent of strokes hit people under age 65, and the cause of many of those strokes remains a mystery. Having had a concussion or other traumatic brain injury might make the risk of a stroke more likely, a study says.

Back in 2011, researchers in Taiwan had unearthed an association between traumatic brain injury and stroke by combing through hospital records.

It's one of those "Oh, really?" findings that gets scientists itching to check it out themselves.

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3:30pm

Wed May 29, 2013

3:15pm

Tue May 28, 2013
Around the Nation

Forgotten For Decades, WWII Alaskans Finally Get Their Due

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 6:43 am

Frankie Kuzuguk, 82, gets a hug from his daughter Marilyn Kuzuguk at Quyanna Care Center in Nome, Alaska, after receiving an official honorable discharge and a distinguished service coin from visiting Veterans Affairs officials. The VA is still tracking down the few surviving members of the World War II Alaska Territorial Guard or delivering benefits to their next of kin.
David Gilkey NPR

Alaskan Clyde Iyatunguk grew up hearing stories about the U.S. Army colonel, Marvin 'Muktuk' Marston, who helped his father trade his spear for a rifle, to protect his homeland during World War II.

Marston is a household name with Native Alaskans. The nickname comes from an Eskimo eating contest — muktuk is whale skin and blubber, eaten raw.

After the Japanese reached the Aleutian Islands in 1942, Marston traveled by dogsled across Alaska looking for volunteers who knew how to fight and survive in the Arctic terrain.

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5:58am

Tue May 28, 2013
Around the Nation

Searching For Veterans On Alaska's Remote Edges

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 6:18 pm

Daniel K. Omedelena, 71, served in the U.S. Army in Vietnam from 1968-69. A disproportionate number of veterans live in rural, sometimes remote parts of the country, like Wales, Alaska. As the veteran population ages, their health care needs increase, but many have not even filed claims with the Department of Veterans Affairs.
David Gilkey NPR

When he was in Vietnam, Isaac Oxereok's small build made him ideal for tunnel-ratting: running with a pistol and a flashlight into underground passages built by the Viet Cong. In 1967 he finished his tour with the Army and returned home to Wales, Alaska. Oxereok knew he wasn't quite right, but there wasn't anyone around to tell him how to get help.

"Post-traumatic syndrome?" he said. "I went through that I guess, mostly on my own. Some wounds never really show. So inside was kind of messed up."

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3:25pm

Sun May 26, 2013
Around the Nation

America's Vets: Returning Home To A Broken System

A wheelchair sits outside the Atlanta VA Medical Center in Atlanta. The latest figures show there are about 900,000 claims for benefits pending at the Department of Veterans Affairs.
David Goldman AP

The Department of Veterans Affairs is being criticized for the shortfall in care for almost a million veterans who can't get timely compensation and have been waiting hundreds of days for help, often to no avail.

Frustration with the agency came to a head last Thursday when VA Secretary Eric Shinseki was called before a closed-door meeting of the House Appropriations Committee.

"We are aggressively executing a plan that we have put together to fix this decades-old problem and eliminate the backlog, as we have indicated, in 2015," Shinseki said after the meeting.

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