U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

5:50am

Tue June 3, 2014
Environment

Was The Greeley Quake A 'Frack Quake'?

A screencap from the Colorado Geological Survey's online earthquake and fault and fold map. Dark blue cirlces denote 1.60 to 2.59 magnitude quakes, bright red denotes 5.59 to 6.59.
Colorado Geological Survey

After a 3.4 magnitude earthquake hit Saturday evening near the northeastern Colorado town of Greeley, questions about its connection to oil and gas development started popping up on social media and in the blogosphere, with anti-fracking activists trying to make a link between the two.

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11:38am

Wed May 28, 2014
Western Slope

Geologists: Soft Rock, Steep Slope Contributors In Collbran Mudslide

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 7:44 pm

This map, put together by the USGS in 1982, shows which parts of the country are most prone to landslides. The areas shaded in red have the highest landslide incidence.
USGS

The area where the Collbran mudslide happened has seen similar slides in the past. Geologists say relatively weak rock and steep terrain create a recipe for such natural disasters. Still, Colorado in general is less vulnerable to slides than wetter areas, like the west coast. Aspen Public Radio's Marci Krivonen reports.

The Colorado Geological Survey began mapping landslides near Collbran in the 1980’s. They discovered the area where this debris flow happened was prone to slides.

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12:19pm

Sun March 2, 2014
Environment

Why Colorado Ranks Fifth In Lightning Damage Nationally

Lightning is a leading cause of storm related deaths in the United States.
Credit hipgnosis vision/Flickr Creative Commons

Warmer weather is coming, and that means thunderstorms. A new Google Map from the U.S. Geological Survey visualizes county-by-county data on lightning damage frequency. Northern Colorado's Front Range is a major target, and it's not just a coincidence.

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4:52pm

Tue October 1, 2013
Science

The Shutdown's Squeeze On Science And Health

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This image was posted by NASA to the agency's official Instagram account.
NASA Getty Images

1:22am

Fri August 23, 2013
Science

Can A Big Earthquake Trigger Another One?

Originally published on Fri August 23, 2013 1:58 pm

Kesennuma, in the Tohoku region of Japan, was devastated in a March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami. A researcher studying recent mega-quakes says this one, centered some 300 miles from Tokyo, could actually mean an increased risk of a quake hitting Japan's capital, one of the most populous metropolitan areas in the world.
Suzanne Mooney Barcroft Media/Landov

There's a joke among scientists: Prediction is difficult, especially about the future. For Ross Stein, it wasn't a joke after the Indian Ocean quake and tsunami in 2004. It killed some 275,000 people. "I just felt almost a sense of shame," Stein says, "that this tragedy could have been so immense in a world where we have so much intense research effort."

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