U.S. Justice Department (DOJ)

1:09am

Thu February 14, 2013
Planet Money

Mavericks, Hot Documents And Beer

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 1:05 am

Lawrence Jackson AP

The boards of American Airlines and US Airways just approved a merger of the two airlines. But the deal still has to win the approval of antitrust regulators at the Justice Department — regulators who last month sued to stop a merger between the beer giants Anheuser-Busch InBev and Grupo Modelo, which brews Corona.

The antitrust division has dozens of economists on staff. Their job, essentially, is to figure out whether a merger would reduce competition so much that a company could raise prices without losing business to competitors.

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1:57pm

Tue February 5, 2013
The Two-Way

5 Questions About Justice Department Memo On Targeted Killings

Originally published on Wed February 6, 2013 4:48 am

A confidential Justice Department memo obtained by NBC News outlines legal theories the Obama administration has used to justify killing American citizens abroad. Here are five key questions and answers about the document:

1) What is it?

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1:44pm

Tue February 5, 2013
The Two-Way

U.S. Says It Has No Plans To Charge Lance Armstrong

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:52 pm

Lance Armstrong during a January interview with Oprah Winfrey regarding the controversy surrounding his cycling career.
Getty Images

The Department of Justice said today that it was sticking by its decision not to pursue any charges against cyclist Lance Armstrong.

"We made a decision on that case a little over a year ago. Obviously, we've been well aware of the statements that have been made by Mr. Armstrong in other media reports. That does not change my view at this time," André Birotte, a U.S. attorney based in Los Angeles, said according to Reuters.

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6:35am

Tue February 5, 2013
The Two-Way

Broader Justification Emerges Of When U.S. Can Kill Americans Who Join Al-Qaida

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 10:57 am

October 2011: Men stand on the rubble of a building destroyed by a U.S. drone strike in southeastern Yemen. Among those killed was U.S. citizen Abdulrahman al-Awlaki, the son of U.S.-born cleric Anwar al-Awlaki — who himself was killed by a drone strike the month before.
Khaled Abdullah Reuters /Landov
  • From 'Morning Edition': Carrie Johnson talks with Steve Inskeep

American citizens who become leaders in al-Qaida or other terrorist organizations overseas and pose "an imminent threat" to Americans may be killed with drone strikes even when there's no evidence that they have specific plans to attack Americans or U.S. interests, according to a Justice Department memo that surfaced Monday.

NPR's Carrie Johnson tells our Newscast Desk that:

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12:41pm

Mon February 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Reports: U.S. Plans To Sue S&P Over Mortgage Bonds Ratings

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 1:01 pm

A sign for Standard & Poor's rating agency stands in front of the company headquarters in New York.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

The United States and some states are planning to sue Standard & Poor's Ratings Services over what they say were the faulty ratings of mortgage bonds leading up to the 2008 financial collapse.

The Wall Street Journal broke the news citing "people familiar with the matter," and The New York York Times is pinning its reporting on S&P, which tells the newspaper it is expecting a lawsuit.

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