Washington D.C.

4:12am

Tue September 23, 2014
Fine Art

Now That's An Artifact: See Mary Cassatt's Pastels At The National Gallery

Originally published on Tue September 23, 2014 11:20 am

These pastel boxes originally owned by Mary Cassatt were acquired recently by the National Gallery of Art. Click here for a closer look.
National Gallery of Art

Imagine if you could see the pen Beethoven used to write his Symphony No. 5. Or the chisel Michelangelo used to sculpt his David. Art lovers find endless fascination in the materials of artists — a pen, a brush, even a rag can become sacred objects, humanizing a work of art.

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2:34pm

Mon September 15, 2014
Code Switch

Alain Locke, Whose Ashes Were Found In University Archives, Is Buried

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 8:02 am

Alain Locke is buried at the Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. He lies near many of the nation's early congressmen and next to the first director of the Smithsonian's Museum of African Art.
Adam Cole NPR

Inside the cemetery, beneath the stained glass, the chapel is full. Mourners line the walls and spill out the door into the rainy day.

About 150 people are gathered for the funeral of a man who died 60 years ago.

Author and philosopher Alain Locke is widely known as the father of the Harlem Renaissance. He inspired Martin Luther King Jr., who praised him as an intellectual leader on par with Plato and Aristotle.

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3:00am

Fri August 1, 2014
Business

Tensions Stir At EPA Hearings On New Emission Rules

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 5:14 am

Some 5,000 union members, led by the United Mine Workers of America, march outside the William S. Moorhead Federal Building on Thursday in Pittsburgh. The city hosted two days of public hearings by the Environmental Protection Agency on stricter pollution rules for coal-burning power plants.
Gene J. Puskar AP

The coal industry made its presence known in Pittsburgh this week for public hearings on President Obama's controversial plan to address climate change. A key element is rules the Environmental Protection Agency proposed in June. They would cut greenhouse gas emissions — chiefly carbon dioxide — from existing power plants. The national goal is 30 percent by 2030, based on 2005 levels.

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8:44am

Thu July 17, 2014
Politics

New Ad Campaign Aims To Persuade Pols Conservation Matters

A view from the popular Indian Peaks wilderness area, outside Boulder.
Chad K Flickr-Creative Commons

Western voters have said they care about conservation and protection of public lands.

Now, an advertising campaign by the Denver-based group Center for Western Priorities aims to persuade elected officials – and those up for election – that land and water conservation is an issue that could affect their candidacy.

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3:15am

Fri June 13, 2014
History

40 Years On, Woodward And Bernstein Recall Reporting On Watergate

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 9:59 am

Journalists Bob Woodward (left) and Carl Bernstein at the Watergate complex in Washington, D.C. Their reporting about the scandal later known as "Watergate" won a Pulitzer Prize.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Many people know All the President's Men as a film: a hit movie about the two young reporters who cracked the Watergate conspiracy. It's the only blockbuster that centers on two guys making phone calls, organizing paper notes and meeting a source called Deep Throat in a parking garage.

But before the movie, there was a book, which came out 40 years ago this month. In it, reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein tell the story of how they uncovered the scandal.

It all started in the Watergate hotel and office complex in Washington.

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