Washington D.C.

3:28pm

Thu August 22, 2013
Science

The World's Most Precise Clock Could Prove Einstein Wrong

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 5:00 pm

This may look like a mad scientist's garage sale, but it's actually the most precise clock ever built.
Jim Burrus NIST

What a makes a good clock? Andrew Ludlow, a physicist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, says one of the most important criteria is stability.

"If you could imagine a grandfather clock and see the pendulum swinging back and forth, ideally that pendulum would swing back and forth very uniformly," Ludlow says. "Each swing would take exactly the same amount of time."

That's stability. But what if something perturbs the system, like a mischievous toddler?

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8:06am

Tue August 20, 2013
Shots - Health News

More Options This Fall For Some Small-Business Workers

Originally published on Tue August 20, 2013 11:58 am

NPR Staff

Workers at small companies are generally starved for choice when it comes to health insurance.

If their employers offer health coverage at all — and only about a third of companies with fewer than 50 workers do — chances are there will be just one plan on the menu.

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8:29am

Thu August 8, 2013
The Two-Way

Stars And Stripes: Pair Of Sumatran Tigers Born At National Zoo

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 11:03 am

A Tigercubcam view of the new cubs, born at the Smithsonian's National Zoo on Monday.
Smithsonian's National Zoo

The Smithsonian's National Zoo has announced the birth of a pair of Sumatran tigers, a species that has dwindled to less than 500 in the wild. Both mother and cubs are reportedly doing well.

There was no immediate word Thursday on the sex of the cubs.

Four-year-old Damai gave birth on Monday. The new arrivals appear healthy, and so far, "Damai is being a great mom, and is nursing and grooming both cubs," the zoo says on its website.

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3:13pm

Wed August 7, 2013
National

For One-Time Tech Exec, Leading D.C. Charity Is No Small Job

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 4:43 pm

Patty Stonesifer once watched Martha's Table serve food to the homeless outside the Washington, D.C., offices of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. When the top post at the charity came open, she knew it was the job for her.
John W. Poole NPR

On a recent morning, Patty Stonesifer sat cross-legged on the floor of a day care classroom, laughing as pre-schoolers clambered into a fire truck made out of a cardboard carton.

This is a far cry from Stonesifer's old life. She made her fortune in the tech world, where she rose through the ranks at Microsoft to become its highest-ranking female executive.

Later, she became the founding CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation — the largest philanthropic organization in the world, with huge, global goals and an endowment of $34 billion when she left in 2008.

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2:29pm

Wed August 7, 2013
The Two-Way

Obama Will Deliver Speech On Steps Of The Lincoln Memorial

Originally published on Wed August 7, 2013 2:40 pm

Marine One flys over the Lincoln Memorial with President Bill Clinton on board as he departed from the National Mall in May of 1999.
Joyce Naltchayan AFP/Getty Images

To commemorate the 50th anniversary of the civil rights' movement March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, President Obama will deliver remarks from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, the White House said today.

It was on those same steps that 50 years ago on August 28, that Martin Luther King delivered his iconic "I Have A Dream" speech.

The Washington Post explains:

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