World

1:28pm

Sat September 29, 2012
Europe

U.K.'s Simmering Class Tensions Roil Over "Plebe" Flap

Originally published on Sun September 30, 2012 11:21 am

British Cabinet Minister Andrew Mitchell is accused of denigrating a police officer during an altercation over his bicycle.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images Europe

A political scandal in the United Kingdom involving a bicycle, a police officer and a bad-tempered Cabinet minister has laid bare lingering tensions over the British class system.

The controversy has provided ammunition to those who charge the Conservative Party-led government is out of touch with ordinary Britons.

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5:43am

Sat September 29, 2012
NPR Story

U.S. Increases Aid To Syria As Violence Rages On

Originally published on Sat September 29, 2012 1:17 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton says the United States will give another $45 million in aid to Syria. That aid will mostly go toward humanitarian assistance, but it will also include communications equipment for the opposition in Syria. The news came at the end of a week of speeches at the U.N. General Assembly in New York, where many raised alarms about the bloodshed in Syria. NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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3:52am

Sat September 29, 2012
Europe

Greeks Battle To 'Survive' Amid New Budget Proposal

Originally published on Sat September 29, 2012 9:25 pm

People with disabilities take part in a march against the government's new austerity measures in central Athens on Thursday.
Petros Giannakouris AP

The Greek government is set to present a new austerity budget on Monday that's supposed to please the institutions that are lending billions to the country to save it from bankruptcy.

But the cuts also come at a time when a deep recession has dragged into its fifth year. More than a third of businesses in Greece have closed, and nearly a quarter of Greeks are unemployed.

Busking For The Next Generation

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4:31pm

Fri September 28, 2012
Afghanistan

Can't Change Your Money In Iran? Try Afghanistan

Originally published on Fri September 28, 2012 5:24 pm

A money-changer in the Afghan city of Herat counts a stack of Iranian bills. More and more Iranian currency is being brought in by smugglers to exchange for dollars, which then go back to Iran.
Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson NPR

The western Afghan city of Herat has become a thriving hub for the money exchange business, a consequence of geography and politics. Money-changers throng the currency market carrying thick stacks of Iranian currency, much of it brought in by the hundreds of thousands of Afghan workers who earn their living in Iran.

While the stacks of crisp 100,000 rial notes that money-changers bring to the market might look like a small fortune, the 10 million rials in each of these stacks is worth less than $400, because the Iranian currency recently lost more than half of its value.

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4:15pm

Fri September 28, 2012
Afghanistan

Iran Turns To Afghanistan When Laundering Money

There may be international sanctions against Iran, but not in Afghanistan's border provinces with the Islamic Republic where trade and money-laundering are thriving. Every day, millions in Iranian currency are brought in by taxis ferrying passengers. The Iranian money is exchanged for dollars, which are then shipped back to Iran. American officials recently ordered the Afghan banks to crack down on this phenomenon and it appears to be having some effect.

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