World

7:50am

Thu April 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Drought Means 20 Million People In England Can't Use Hoses

No hoses, please. (2006 file photo from Knutsford, England.)
Christopher Furlong Getty Images
  • Larry Miller, reporting for the NPR Newscast

The words "hosepipe ban" popped up in a lot of headlines today, and since we'd never seen that phrase before we wondered what was going on.

It turns out that 20 million people in south-east England, including London, have been told they can't use hoses to water their gardens, wash their cars, fill their pools, clean their patios and a variety of other things (the BBC has a Q&A on what's allowed and not allowed).

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5:05am

Thu April 5, 2012
The Two-Way

In Greece, Retiree's Suicide Sparks Protests And Clashes With Police

Demonstrators clashed with riot police in Athens overnight.
Aris Messinis AFP/Getty Images

The human toll from the financial crisis in Greece now has a human face.

After 77-year-old retired pharmacist Dimitris Christoulas killed himself Wednesday outside the parliament building in Athens, a suicide note he left was reported to say that he felt he must take a "dignified end to my life" because austerity measures and "annihilated all traces for my survival," particularly his pension.

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1:29am

Thu April 5, 2012
Religion

Vatican, Israel Spar Over Disputed Last Supper Site

This room, known as the Cenacle on Mount Zion in Jerusalem, is venerated as the site of Jesus' Last Supper. Jews and Muslims also consider the building to be a holy site, and it has been a source of contention for years. Israel and the Vatican may be nearing an agreement.
Richard T. Nowitz Corbis

If there's one building in Jerusalem that represents the city's tangle of religions, this is it. The ground floor is a Jewish holy site said to house the tomb of the biblical King David. The second floor is the Cenacle, a Christian holy site, the room believed to be the site of Jesus' Last Supper. On the roof, there's an old minaret from when this place was marked a Muslim holy site.

One building, three religions, decades of property disputes. And the fight isn't over.

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1:28am

Thu April 5, 2012
Europe

Two Decades After Siege, Sarajevo Still A City Divided

Originally published on Thu April 5, 2012 8:30 am

Twenty years ago this week, the Bosnian war began with the siege of Sarajevo, the capital. In this photo, smoke billows from a building in downtown Sarajevo, April 22, 1992, after a Serbian mortar attack.
H. Delich AP

April 6 marks the 20th anniversary of the start of the Bosnian war and the siege of Sarajevo. It was the longest siege of a capital city in modern history, and produced the worst atrocities in Europe since World War II.

Over three-and-a-half years of war, 100,000 people were killed, and half of Bosnia's population of 4.4 million — made up of a plurality of Muslims — fled their homes.

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1:52pm

Wed April 4, 2012
The Two-Way

Theater Bombing In Mogadishu Breaks Tenuous Calm In Somalia

Ambulances are parked outside the Mogadishu National Theatre on Wednesday after a suicide attack in the Somali capital. A young woman strapped with explosives blew herself up on at a ceremony in the Somali national theater attended by the prime minister and other officials.
Abdurashid Abdulle AFP/Getty Images

Just as things had begun to seem peaceful in the Somali capital, a bomb exploded in the newly reopened National Theater. And it happened as the prime minister gave an address.

The New York Times reports that the bombing shattered what had been a tenuous calm in Mogadishu, which has been the center of a fierce civil war for the past 21 years.

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