World

2:02am

Fri March 16, 2012
Middle East

A Death In Syria

Originally published on Fri March 16, 2012 9:14 am

Abdulrahman Abu Lebdeh was a Syrian protester who was killed last fall in his hometown of Tal Kalakh.
Courtesy of Abu Lebdeh family

The United Nations estimates some 8,000 people have been killed in Syria since the uprising began one year ago. One of them was Abdulrahman Abu Lebdeh, 24, who was killed in the town of Tal Kalakh last fall. His parents, his brother and one of his friends, who was also an activist, told the story of his life and death to NPR's Kelly McEvers and Lava Selo.

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2:40pm

Thu March 15, 2012
Middle East

For Fleeing Syrians, Jordan Offers Bare-Bones Refuge

Originally published on Tue September 25, 2012 8:39 am

A family of Syrian refugees in a camp set up near the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the Syrian border. Jordan has welcomed Syrian refugees, but has limited resources to help them.
Khalil Mazraawi AFP/Getty Images

If you're trying to escape the turmoil in Syria for the calm in Jordan, you have two choices.

You can go the legal way. Just get in a car and try to drive across the border. But that's not very easy these days. The Syrian government isn't letting many people out.

Or you can try the illegal way. Wait until nightfall, climb through a barbed-wire fence. It sounds dodgy, but if you make it over, you'll actually be welcomed by the Jordanian army. Troops will take your name, give you a drink of water, let you rest.

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1:43pm

Thu March 15, 2012
Asia

Provocative Chinese Cartoonists Find An Outlet Online

Originally published on Sat March 17, 2012 4:40 am

In this illustration by a Chinese cartoonist who goes by the name Rebel Pepper, an anglerfish, representing the Chinese Communist Party, hypnotizes smaller fish, representing the Chinese people, with the glowing image of a famous, model soldier — with the implied intention of devouring them while they're distracted.
Courtesy Rebel Pepper

Chinese cartoonists have used the Internet in recent years to take aim at the Communist Party. Using Twitter-like microblogs, they try to slip past censors and skewer their government in ways that would have been unthinkable a generation ago.

One of their targets this month is an old-fashioned Communist propaganda campaign extolling the virtues of Lei Feng, a model People's Liberation Army soldier who was devoted to his fellow workers and China's leaders — and who has been dead for half a century.

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1:32pm

Thu March 15, 2012
Middle East

Along Syrian Border, Turks Torn By Divided Loyalties

Originally published on Thu March 15, 2012 3:59 pm

Syrians and Turks show their support for Syrian President Bashar Assad in Turkey's southern city of Antakya on Feb. 19. Assad is a member of the minority Alawite religious sect, and many Alawites on both sides of the border support him.
Zohra Bensemra Reuters /Landov

The Syrian regime's heavy crackdown on dissent has led to a sharp plunge in relations with neighboring Turkey. But the regime does have its Turkish supporters — mainly members of the Alawite minority, the same Islamic sect Syria's ruling Assad family comes from. And that has resulted in complicated loyalties among some Turks, especially those along the border in southeastern Turkey's Hatay province.

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8:55am

Thu March 15, 2012
The Two-Way

Nigerian Leaders May Be In Talks With Boko Haram Militants

Onlookers view the wreckage of a car bomb that exploded outside a church near Madalla, Nigeria on Christmas Day, 2011 killing scores of people. Boko Haram claimed responsibility for the attack.
Sunday Aghaeze AP

Nigerian authorities may be holding indirect talks with leaders of Boko Haram, the Islamist militant group responsible for scores of bombing attacks, according to Reuters. The militant group is infamous for its violence, such as the bombing of the UN building in Abuja last August, and deadly church bombings on Christmas Day, 2011 that killed 35.

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