World

1:28pm

Wed February 22, 2012
Asia

On Tibetan Plateau, A Sense Of Constant Surveillance

Ethnic Tibetan pilgrims walk on a road during Tibetan New Year in Langmusixiang, Sichuan province, in western China, Feb. 22. Celebrations are subdued in the Tibetan areas of China this year, after a string of self-immolations and protest against Chinese control.
Carlos Barria Reuters /Landov

Wednesday marks the traditional Tibetan New Year, but many Tibetans won't be celebrating. They'll be mourning the almost two-dozen people who set themselves on fire in the past year as a protest against Chinese rule. Eyewitnesses say the town of Aba, site of many of the self-immolations, resembles a Chinese military camp, with soldiers and riot police every few feet. NPR's Louisa Lim traveled elsewhere on the Tibetan plateau to cover the story and sent this dispatch.

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1:23pm

Wed February 22, 2012
The Two-Way

IAEA Team Returns From Iran Empty Handed

Originally published on Wed February 22, 2012 3:55 pm

Herman Nackaerts (center), deputy director general and head of the Department of Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency, is interviewed as he arrives after his flight from Iran at Vienna's Schwechat airport on Wednesday.
Ronald Zak AP

A team of United Nations nuclear experts has returned from Iran empty-handed. In a statement today, the International Atomic Energy Agency said that Iran refused the team access to a military site at Parchin.

The statement read in part:

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12:44pm

Wed February 22, 2012
The Two-Way

Commuter Train Crash Kills Dozens In Argentina, Passengers Still Trapped

Firemen rescue wounded passengers from a commuter train after it crashed in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Wednesday Feb. 22, 2012.
Anibal Greco AP

A commuter train carrying people into downtown Buenos Aires collided with a retaining wall during morning rush hour, killing at least 49 people riding in carriages and waiting on the platform.

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11:26am

Wed February 22, 2012
National Security

Dealing With Dictators, The U.S. Playbook Varies

Originally published on Wed February 22, 2012 2:44 pm

The U.S. has taken very different approaches to authoritarian rulers in recent years. President Obama has called for the ouster of Syrian President Bashar Assad, shown here in Damascus on Jan. 11, but has resisted calls for the use of U.S. military force against the Syrian regime.
STR AFP/Getty Images

What is America's policy when it comes to dictators? Well, it depends.

The U.S. has adopted different approaches toward different dictators and authoritarian regimes in recent years. In some cases — notably Iraq and Afghanistan — the U.S. military invaded to change the leaders of those countries.

But American presidents have also hosted friendly visits with leaders from undemocratic countries with questionable human rights records.

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10:50am

Wed February 22, 2012
The Two-Way

Mubarak Verdict Due On June 2

Originally published on Wed February 22, 2012 11:00 am

Outside the court in Cairo where former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has been on trial, a man earlier today held a sign saying there was a noose waiting for Mubarak.
Marco Longari AFP/Getty Images

As the case against former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak came to a close today, the trial judge announced he expects to deliver a verdict on June 2.

According to al-Jazeera:

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